All posts tagged you read to me and i’ll read to you

reading, reading strategies, getting kids to read, boys and reading, reluctant readers, You Read to Me and I'll Read to You, shared reading

From Reluctant Reader to Voracious Reader: What Worked for Me

Turning a Reluctant Readers into a Voracious Reader

(Article first published as From Reluctant Reader to Voracious Reader on Technorati and Imagination Soup.)

Can the elimination of book store chain affect middle school literacy? Sadly, yes. The closing of Borders, according to a recent report by media and publishing forecast firm Simba Information will stunt the children’s and young adult publishing market in the U.S.as the industry adjusts to a smaller book retailing footprint. This is because, “On a whole, the children’s/YA market still depends on print books — and a complicated connection between the publisher and the increasingly hard-to-reach reader. Read more…

shared reading, reading together, reluctant readers

Partnered Reading Tutorial for Getting Reluctant Readers to Read

Shared Reading to Get Reluctant Readers Reading

This is a great blog post on Partnered Reading to encourage your reluctant reader to read from Practical Pages.  She also gives some great resources if you need further advice. Read more…

Explode the Code, best phonics workbooks, teaching kids to read,

Best Phonics Workbooks and Reading Strategies

Best Phonics Workbooks to Help Your Child Read

There’s nothing like feeling like your child is falling behind to prompt a Pragmatic Mom to scramble for supplemental materials to catch her darling up.  Whether you feel your child is begging for phonics or that your child needs a little boost to be where they should be, these phonics materials really work and come recommended by three mom friends who were also teachers. Read more…

Summer Curriculum to Boost Your Child’s Confidence

Summer Learning to Boost Your Child’s Confidence

I’ve learned from my children that:

  • They like to do what they are good at (even if it’s their own perception and not reality).
  • And the corollary, they avoid things they think are not good at (even if it’s their own perception and not reality).
  • The more they do something, the better they get at it.
  • The better they get at it, the more they want to do it. (nice circular logic!) Read more…