All posts tagged Great Nonfiction Books to Explore Our World & GIVEAWAY

Great Nonfiction Books to Explore Our World and 5 Book GIVEAWAY

Great Nonfiction Books to Explore Our World and 5 Book GIVEAWAY

I’m exploring our world today through eight beautifully illustrated nonfiction books. I’m always on the lookout for books that teach my kids geography; they never seem to know where countries are located and often get even the continent wrong. Until they can world travel — my oldest is planning on taking a gap year after high school — we are arm chair traveling via books.

I’m giving five of them away to five winners. Please fill out the Rafflecopter at the bottom to enter.

How about you? What nonfiction picture books have caught your eye lately?

Great Nonfiction Books to Explore Our World

The Earth Book: A World of Exploration and Wonder by Jonathan Litton, illustrated by Thomas Hegbrook

This beautiful nonfiction picture book is broken out into four sections: physical earth, life on earth, earth regions, and human planet. Each section then has one or two page spreads that then give a detailed overview of each “chapter.” For example, earth regions are broken down into oceans, islands, rainforests, poles, deserts, and extreme earth. This book does a good job presenting a lot of information in a readable day. Rainforests uses the illustration to show the different layers of the rainforest; it includes ten animals found in the rainforest, and it includes rainforests in different geographic areas, as well as a summarized paragraph about the current state of rainforests. Browse this book with your child to discover the earth and all its wonders. [nonfiction picture book, ages 7 and up]

This Is How We Do It: One Day in the Lives of Seven Kids from around the World by Matt Lamothe

Flowering Minds‘s loves this book too: “In this wonderful non-fiction book, we get to peek into the lives of seven kids from around the world and see how different and similar they lives are.” I was both struck by the beautiful illustrations and the information that includes what each child eats using their native words which can be looked up in the glossary in the back. She noticed that “all the families are nuclear – mother, father, kids. In many parts of the world, families will include a grandparent, great-grandparent, aunt, uncle all living under a single roof. I feel that the opportunity to show diversity in families was lost.” I think that’s a great point. Darshana has further resources for those who want to compare and contrast or do a book extension such as cooking a recipe from the book.

I would also suggest What The World Eats which I think is fascinating. It shows the groceries that a family eats in the course of a week. Not only do you see the groceries each family uses for the week’s meals but also the members of each family. [nonfiction picture book, ages 5 and up]

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