All posts in Multicultural Books for Kids

FREE Classroom Empathy Kit: Immigration & Refugees

FREE Classroom Empathy Kit: Immigration & Refugees

Our FREE Classroom Empathy Kit is ready to download and share!

As our fifth Multicultural Children’s Book Day holiday approaches on January 27, 2018, we are thrilled to present our second Classroom Kit for teachers, librarians, parents, and guardians.

Our 2017 Multicultural Children’s Book Day Classroom Kindness Kit is here.

Our 2018 Classroom Empathy Kit has a special poster from award-winning author Juana Medina. This kit’s emphasis is on understanding the immigrants and refugee experience and includes a booklist along with some excellent activity ideas. Read more…

Asian Culture Series: Asian Crafts and Activities & 2 Book GIVEAWAY

Asian Culture Series: Asian Crafts and Activities & 2 Book GIVEAWAY

I’m excited to announce a quarterly series with Debbi Michiko Florence, author of early chapter book series Jasmine Toguchi! We want to highlight Asian culture in a way that kids can relate to and that means … hands-on activities, food they can help prepare and eat, and a book list!

Mia Wenjen and Debbi Michiko Florence

We have crafted a series of six topics, one per quarter for the next year and a half, that explore Asian culture in a fun way: Asian New Year, Asian Drumming, Pink Flamingo Day, Picnic & Scavenger Hunt, Snow Statues and Sumo! We hope you will enjoy this series!

To kick of this series, we are also giving away two of Debbi Michiko Florence’s Jasmine Toguchi books. To enter, please fill out the Rafflecopter at the bottom.

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Diverse Children's Books

#DiverseKidLit #ownvoices Linky

Our theme for this #DiverseKidLit is #ownvoices. The #ownvoices hashtag was created to draw attention to diverse authors and illustrators who are creating books that honor their own heritage and experiences. (As always, the theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

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Filipino Folk Tales & 2 Book Bundle GIVEAWAY!

Filipino Folk Tales & 2 Book Bundle GIVEAWAY!

It’s interesting how few Filipino children’s books are available in the United States, despite being 1.1% of the population, numbering 4 million. Filipinos are the second largest self-reported Asian ancestry group after Chinese Americans according to 2010 American Community Survey.

I have a list of Filipino picture books created by illustrator Mika Song to complement this list of Filipino Folk Tales. Am I missing any? Thanks for your help!

Thank you to Tuttle Publishing for their generous giveaway of these six Filipino books! We are giving away two packages of wonderful Filipino books for kids! Please use the Rafflecopter at the bottom to enter.

Filipino Folk Tales

Rockabye Crocodile: A Folktale from the Philippines by Jose Aruego and Ariane Dewey

This is a very sweet story of the importance of kindness and the rewards that it brings. Two boars are neighbors. Anabel is kind and cheerful. Nettie is mean and selfish. When Anabel encounters a crocodile, her kindness is rewarded by an abundance of fish that the crocodile supplies in return for taking care of its crying baby. Nettie wants the same reward, but because she goes about it in a selfish way, her payment is quite different. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

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10 Picture Books Celebrating Korean Culture & 3 Signed Book GIVEAWAY!

10 Picture Books Celebrating Korean Culture & 3 Signed Book GIVEAWAY!

Please welcome my guest blogger today, author and illustrator Aram Kim! Her newest book, No Kimchi for Me! is something that I can relate to as this is exactly how my oldest daughter, now 17, learned to love kimchi!

No Kimchi for Me! by Aram Kim

Yoomi hates stinky, spicy kimchi―the pickled cabbage condiment served at Korean meals. So her brothers call her a baby and refuse to play with her. Yoomi is determined to eat kimchi. She tries to disguise it by eating it on a cookie, on pizza, and in ice cream. But that doesn’t work. Then Grandma shows Yoomi how to make kimchi pancakes.

This story about family, food, and a six-year-old “coming of age” has universal themes, and at the same time celebrates Korean culture. A kimchi pancake recipe and other back matter are included. [picture book, ages 3 and up]

As for me, I’m half Japanese and half Chinese American but I married an Korean American. I was introduced to Korean food in college, including kimchi which I really enjoy, to the great amusement of my Korean mother-in-law!

Aram has created a picture book list for anyone who wants to celebrate or learn about Korean culture. I was thrilled that there are actually ten picture books on this topic!

Aram and I are giving away 3 SIGNED copies of No Kimchi for Me! Please fill out the Rafflecopter at the bottom to enter.

p.s. I have a few Korean American book lists here:

Top 10 Korean American Books for Kids

15 Great Korean Folk Tales for Kids

10 Wonderful Picture Books Celebrating Korean Culture

1. My Name is Yoon by Helen Recorvits, illustrated by Gabi Swiatkowska

The story shows how a little Korean girl who moved to America slowly and gradually opens up and embraces her new home. Narrated by the little girl Yoon, readers can see how she sees and feels the world around her. Gorgeous, and somewhat surreal illustrations are icing on the cake. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

2. Junas Jar by Jane Bahk, illustrated by Felicia Hoshino

Very sweet and charming story of a girl who deals with her best friend’s sudden departure by going on various imaginary adventures. Soft and beautiful illustrations accompany the text seamlessly. Very heartwarming and satisfying ending. [picture book, ages 5 and up]

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OCD Characters in Children's and Young Adult books

OCD Characters in Children’s and Young Adult Books

My son has had a series of tics since he was little from squeeky sounds, to a Tiger Woods arm pump, to an extra hop in his step. There was also a throat clearing noise and excessive eye blinking. He generally would move from one tic to the next one in smooth succession.

When he had a severe concussion this past year, his neurologist said that he had Tourette’s Syndrome. His psychologist — very helpful for concussion because it can cause depression and anxiety — said that my son would have to have three tics simultaneously for it to be Tourette’s so he was deemed with just having a tic.

We actually think his tics are cute and it never worried us like his concussion does. We also figured he would outgrown it, which may very well be the case according this therapist.

This is what I learned about tics, Tourette Syndrome, and OCD:

Tics, Tourette Syndrome, and OCD

Tics are rapid, repetitive movements or vocal utterances. They may be motor (like excessive eye blinking) or vocal (such as a habitual cough or chronic repetitive throat clearing noises), chronic (continuing throughout childhood), or transient (lasting less than 1–2 years). In children who eventually develop tic disorders and ADHD, the ADHD usually develops 2 to 3 years before the tics.

Tourette syndrome, which is quite rare, is a more severe form of tic disorder involving motor and vocal tics that occur many times per day. The average age at which it appears is 7 years. While children with Tourette syndrome may develop ADHD, the 2 disorders are separate and independent conditions. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is not a variant of Tourette syndrome, and Tourette syndrome is not just a variety of ADHD. Research has shown that chronic tic disorders, Tourette syndrome, and OCD may stem from some common factors, and a child with any of these conditions is quite likely to also have ADHD.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder involves such symptoms as obsessive thoughts (such as a highly exaggerated fear of germs) and compulsive behaviors (for example, excessive hand-washing  in an attempt to reduce the fear of germs) that the child is unable to control or limit. In this sense, OCD is similar to tic disorders and Tourette syndrome, and creates additional functioning problems for children with ADHD. From HealthyKids.org

 

One out of a hundred children suffer from OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder). Research indicates that it is due to a chemical imbalance in the brain. From Mr. Worry

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common, chronic and long-lasting disorder in which a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions) that he or she feels the urge to repeat over and over. from NIMH

I found that I was misinformed about OCD. Author Wesley King also helped to set me straight:

“Obsessive Compulsion Disorder (OCD) is one of the most common but least understood mental illnesses in the world today. ‘I am so OCD’ has become a popular saying to describe someone who likes things clean and organized. But OCD is not liking things clean or organizing your socks. It’s a constant battle with your mind that can afflict every minute of every day.” OCDANIEL author note by Wesley King 

I hope these books with characters who suffer from OCD help us all to understand this mental health disease. I am going to keep this list updated as I find more books, and will also link back to book reviews from other bloggers. Thanks for your help in building this list!

 

OCD Characters in Children’s and Young Adult books

Mr. Worry: A Story about OCD by  Holly L. Niner, illustrated by Greg Swearingen 

This is a great picture book for anyone who wants to understand what it is like to be a child with OCD. It explains why they can’t help checking the same things over and over again. In this story, Dr. Fraser explains how his brain handles doubts and fears. She teaches him how to “hang up”–  the same as if you receive a wrong number phone call — on those doubts and fears using a combination of medicine and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). This is a comforting story to understand the battles that children with OCD face in their heads, and the strategies to overcome them. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

OCDaniel by Wesley King

Ms. Yingling Reads has a great review here which is how I discovered this book.

This is an almost autobiographical account of the author’s 8th grade when he hid his OCD from everyone. He used ritualized compulsions to try to control anxiety and panic attacks and had no idea what the cause was until he was 16. OCDANIEL deals with fitting in, a girl crush, and discovering the hero within himself. It’s an uplifting story of unlikely friendships. [chapter book, ages 9 and up]

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Diverse Children's Books

Please Join Us for #diversekidlit

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

Read more…

8 Asian Cinderella Picture Books including the Original

9 Asian Cinderella Picture Books including the Original

I’ve always wondered why Cinderella is such a popular fairy tale the world over. According to Cinderella: A Cross Culture Story, the original Cinderella dates back to China as early as 850 A.D with Yeh-ShenThe oldest European version was from Italy in 1634, traveling from China.

The elements of all the Cinderella fairy tales make for a good story: good wins over evil, rags to riches is possible, and, of course, the happily ever after ending. There’s also the widowed and sometimes hapless father who seems totally unaware of his bad marital choice, the conniving new step relatives, and the heroine who is rewarded for her goodness by a magical element rather than through her own fortitude.

It makes me wonder if a Cinderella narrative is good for girls? Maybe this is why the Wonder Woman movie is making such waves with Amazons who don’t need men, and are strong and fierce warriors who, frankly, make the men they battle look wimpy.

Today, I thought I’d survey the Asian Cinderella folk tales, which I’ve organized alphabetically by country.

What do you think? Are you Team Cinderella or Team Wonder Woman?

8 Asian Cinderella Picture Books

Angkat: The Cambodian Cinderella by Jewell Reinhart Coburn, illustrated by Eddie Flotte

Angkat appeared in an 18th century French essay while the author was researching Khmer folklore. The story, of course, is much older than that, but the exact age is not known. You can see the story’s roots from the Chinese version, Yeh-Shen, with the same element of magical fish.

Life changes for a lonely fisherman and his daughter when he meets a widow with her daughter across the fish ponds. Family discord centers around who will be called Number One Daughter. Traditionally, it should be Angkat, as the daughter of the father, but the stepmother schemes to get this title for her own daughter. The Number Two daughter’s role is that of family servant, and Angkat is tricked into this position through a rigged fishing contest. Angkat ends up releasing her fish into the fish pond, and caring for it as a pet. Her stepsister finds out and cruelly cooks the fish.

A Spirit of Virtue tells Angkat that her fish’s bones are magical, and finds two golden slippers in its place. Following the Spirit’s advice, she places on slipper on the open window sill and hides the other. A black bird carries the slipper to the crown prince, who searches for the mate, wanting to marry her.

The story has the traditional shoe finding element, but then the story departs from the typical ending. Her father, stepsister and stepfather are overcome with jealousy at her happiness. They kill her to get the stepsister into the palace. Where Angkat was killed, a banana tree has sprouted up. When it’s cut down, bamboo takes it place. The prince finds this bamboo grove and is able to reunited with Angkat, with the help of the Spirit of Virtue. Angkat’s family is banished from the land, and she becomes the rightful queen. [fairy tale picture book, ages 6 and up]

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