All posts in 3) Grade K-2

Meet Yasmin!

Meet Yasmin! Cover Reveal!!

I’m thrilled today to do a very special cover reveal for Saadia Faruqi’s debut children’s book series, Yasmin.

Meet Yasmin! by Saadia Faruqi, illustrated by Hatem Aly 

Yasmin Ahmad is a spirited second-grader who’s always on the lookout for those “aha” moments to help her solve life’s little problems. Taking inspiration from her surroundings and her big imagination, she boldly faces any situation―assuming her imagination doesn’t get too big, of course! A creative thinker and curious explorer, Yasmin and her multi-generational Pakistani American family will delight and inspire readers. [easy reader, for ages 5 and up]

Meet Yasmin!

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Discover Your World Picture Book GIVEAWAY!

Discover Your World Picture Book GIVEAWAY!

What does it mean to children to discover the world around them? I’m taking the view that it’s a full body experience from bathing to world religion to the natural world. The commonality: discovering children from around the world and finding similarities. If your kids want to take this path of discovery, I’m jump starting this by giving away two books. Please fill out the Rafflecopter at the bottom to win 2 books, one to each winner. Please leave a comment about your first choice.

Picture Books to Discover Your World

My First Book About the Qur’an: Teachings for Toddlers and Young Children by Sara Khan, illustrated by Ali Lodge

The Qur’an is the holy book of Islam and this board book is a great introduction to children of any age who want to learn about the Muslim faith. This is a great book to include in teach kids about world religions. [board book, ages 1 and up]

Beautiful Rainbow World by Suzee Ramirez and Lynne Raspet

Daria: World Music for Children sings this song. Now the lyrics make up the test for this beautiful photo-illustrated book to celebrate diversity around the world through images of children at play.

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FREE Classroom Empathy Kit: Immigration & Refugees

FREE Classroom Empathy Kit: Immigration & Refugees

Our FREE Classroom Empathy Kit is ready to download and share!

As our fifth Multicultural Children’s Book Day holiday approaches on January 27, 2018, we are thrilled to present our second Classroom Kit for teachers, librarians, parents, and guardians.

Our 2017 Multicultural Children’s Book Day Classroom Kindness Kit is here.

Our 2018 Classroom Empathy Kit has a special poster from award-winning author Juana Medina. This kit’s emphasis is on understanding the immigrants and refugee experience and includes a booklist along with some excellent activity ideas. Read more…

Skittles Rainbow Science Experiment Fail

Easy and Fun Rainbow Science Experiments

A rainbow is made of the colors red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet. Where did the rainbow come from? All the colors exist in sunlight. We can’t see them because they are mixed together.

When sunlight moves from the air to the water in the glass, it bends in a special way. When it bends, the light separates into all the colors of the rainbow. It’s called refraction. From How To Make a Rainbow video

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Zap Zap Kindergarten Math app for learning numeracy and number recognition

Kindergarten Math Summer Learning Fun

I’m thrilled to partner with Zap Zap to announce their new Zap Zap Kindergarten Math app!Zap Zap Kindergarten Math app

It’s no secret that kids love playing games on their screens, and they will practice math facts if it’s presented in the form of a puzzle or game.

Zap Zap Kindergarten Math app for learning numeracy and number recognition Read more…

#BlackHistoryMonth by Carole Boston Weatherford

#BlackHistoryMonth by Carole Boston Weatherford

I had the distinct pleasure of meeting Carole Boston Weatherford in Roxbury, Massachusetts last year. I was struck by her quiet elegance and dignity. Her books reflect that too.

Carole Boston Weatherford and Ekua Holmes with Mia Wenjen

Carole Boston Weatherford is on the left. Ekua Holmes is on the right.

I didn’t realize how many #BlackHistoryMonth stories that would have remained largely untold if not for Carole’s work. Today, I wanted to share with you her books in honor of #BlackHistoryMonth.

#BlackHistoryMonth by Carole Boston Weatherford

The Legendary Miss Lena Horne by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon

Lena Horne

Lena Horne, image from Wikipedia

Lena Horne was both an legendary actress and activist, born into a well educated and high achieving family. During the Great Depression, Lena started her career at the Cotton Club as a dancer in the chorus line. Her career catapulted from there, to Broadway, headlining an all-white band, to Hollywood. During WWII, her activist side emerged in full force, which resulted in being blacklisted during McCarthy’s Red Scare. Still, Lena persisted. With a new husband, she was able to further her career to become an international star, and use her fame in the fight for civil rights. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Freedom in Congo Square by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

Congo Square New Orleans

Congo Square, U.S. National Register of Historic Places, image from Wikipedia

“Slavery was no ways fair. Six more days to Congo Square.” The back story of the birth of jazz in New Orleans: because Louisiana was a French colony, then a Spanish colony, even slaves had Sunday off from work. In most states, African drums and music were banned. But once a week at Congo Square in New Orleans, hundreds of slaves and free blacks would congregate, play music, and dance. Told in simple rollicking rhyme, this picture book is exuberant as it is informational about a little known story that expresses a human’s capacity to find hope and joy even in the most difficult circumstances. And this resulted in the birth of jazz, America’s only original art form. Carole Boston Weatherford’s books are all exceptional. Both she and illustrator R. Gregory Christie are Coretta Scott King Honorees. Freedom in Congo Square is one of my (accurate) Caldecott picks. [picture book, ages 2 and up]

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My Very Short Diversity Picture Book Videos

My Very Short Diversity Picture Book Videos

I’ve been making very, very short picture book videos on my YouTube channel. I only have 47 subscribers, so if you would subscribe, I’d be very grateful!

I made over three dozen picture book videos so far of newly published books, but I picked these five diversity books to highlight today.

5 Wonderful Diversity Picture Books Made Into a Very Short Video

Mamá the Alien by Rene Colato Lainez, illustrated by Laura Lacamara

The confusion of being a legal alien versus an alien from outer space makes its bilingual Spanish picture book the perfect conversation starter about the naturalization process. MAMA THE ALIEN by Rene Colato Lainez, illustrated by Laura Lacamara. ♫ Background song, Englishman In New York by Sting. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

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Great New Early Chapter Books

Great New Early Chapter Books

I was a first round judge for The Cybils Easy Readers and Early Chapter Books this past fall which meant that I read about 50 Easy Readers and 80+ Early Chapter Books that were nominated by the general public. Our group then came up with the short list, and then round two judges picked a winner in each category.

To keep track of each book, I kept notes on each book, rating it on a 5 point scale. I share my notes below of the books I liked the most (4.5 or 5/5). Our group then held online discussions via email on books that we liked, culminating in an online discussion to pick the short list. It’s interesting that  that strong reactions to books could go either way. A good example is The Case of the Missing Carrot Cake by Robin Newman … I loved the film noir detective story but not everyone agreed with me.  Charlie Bumpers vs. The Perfect Little Turkey is another book that I loved especially for its boy appeal — our list felt girl audience heavy — but our group tried to be gender neutral.


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Great New Easy Readers

Great New Easy Readers

It just so happened that most of the diversity picks on the nominated easy readers for The Cybils made the short list. I personally was a champion of Don’t Throw It to Mo! by David Adler which also won the Geisel Award.

My fellow judges were mostly librarians and they needed something fresh to get excited about. I can relate; I think an award like The Cybils is helpful to highlight new authors rather than award a long running and popular series like Elephant and Piggie. In fact, the popularity of Elephant and Piggie spawned many knock offs which starts to become tiresome as well. And, my final gripe is that there is only so much rhyming you can pull off with fox/box, yet there were more books that you’d expect with this rhyming scheme.

The upshot is that new Easy Readers seem to be a pretty closed off group: books are either popular series that seem to spawn endless books, imitators of these popular series, or rhyming sequences involving “fox” and “box.” While most of the selections below fit into those three categories, they are the best of the pile and there are also a few that refreshingly don’t.

How about you? Are there any Easy Readers that you don’t mind reading over and over again? Please share! Thank you! Read more…