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Asian New Year Picture Books and Crafts

Asian New Year Books and Crafts

Author Debbi Michiko Florence and I are creating a six-part Asian Culture Series with books, activities, and recipes. We are kicking off the series by looking at the Asian New Year.

This is part one of our 6 Part Asian Craft and Culture Series:

Did you know that Japanese New Year and Korean New Year are celebrated on January 1st, but Chinese New Year and Tet, Vietnamese New Year, is celebrated based on the lunar calendar? (More Chinese New Year books here.)

microwave mochi for Japanese New Year

Today, we are sharing:

  • Making mochi the easy way by way of a microwave!
  • A Chinese Red Envelope Craft
  • A picture book list for Asian New Year

Thanks for coming on our Asian Culture series journey. Will you celebrate an Asian New Year this upcoming year? We hope this post will make it easier! Read more…

Top 10 Chapter Books about Chinese Culture & 3 Book GIVEAWAY

Top 10 Chapter Books about Chinese Culture & 3 Book GIVEAWAY

Please welcome author Dori Jones Yang, whose latest book is The Forbidden Temptation of Baseball. She presents ten middle grade chapter books to learn about Chinese culture. It’s a great list!

We are also giving away 3 copies of The Forbidden Temptation of Baseball. Please fill out the Rafflecopter at the bottom to enter.

How about you? What books with themes of China have you or your children enjoyed?

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My newest book, The Forbidden Temptation of Baseball (age 10 and up), tells how another Chinese child adapted to life in America. This one takes place in the 1870s, when China’s government sent 120 boys to New England to study English and technology for fifteen years. While researching the Chinese Educational Mission, I was fascinated to learn that many of the boys loved playing baseball—despite the requirement that they wear their hair in a braid. That set my imagination on fire. My book tells of two fictional brothers; one adapts rather quickly and the other has a much harder time.

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5 Family-Friendly Attractions in Niagara Falls

5 Family-Friendly Attractions in Niagara Falls

Niagara Falls, Canada is the perfect destination for a family vacation. With American Falls and Bridal Veil Falls right across the border in the United States, and the iconic Horseshoe Falls straddling the border, Niagara Falls offers some of the continent’s most breathtaking natural majesty.

But that’s not all you’ll find in this popular destination city. Niagara Falls also boasts family-friendly attractions to suit all tastes. Here are five of the most popular Niagara Falls attractions you and your kids will love: Read more…

How to Guard Your Child from Developing Eating Disorders

How to Guard Your Child from Developing Eating Disorders

One day your child was happy and carefree, and the next she or he seems moody, depressed, and has stopped eating.

The reason children develop eating disorders ranges widely. According to Mayo Clinic, it could be that he or she wants to join an activity that requires participants to be lean. For example, cheerleading, gymnastics, ballet, etc. Or it could be due to pressure from his or her peers to be thin. And yes, even children under 12 can begin to feel this pressure. In a Common Sense Media report, it was found that kids as young as five years old are already thinking about ideal body types. Read more…

Lao and Hmong Children's Books

Lao and Hmong Children’s Books

It’s clear to me when trying to create this list that there are not enough Lao and Hmong children’s books out there! They were hard to come by even through my public library system so I purchased Lao Folktales and The Hemp and the Beeswax: A Hmong Cinderella. If you need either for your home or classroom library, please leave me a comment about why you need it and I’ll send them to you.

How about you? Do you have any book suggestions for this list? They would be most welcome. Thank you!

 

Mali Under the Night Sky: A Lao Story of Home by Youme Landowne

This is the true story of Laotian American artist Malichansouk Kouanchao, whose family was forced by civil war to flee Laos when she was five. Mali lived an idyllic life in the country with her family until the war began. Forced to flee, Mali and her family are arrested for not having a home in this country. With her childhood memories to sustain her, Mali tells stories of home to her fellow refugees. [picture book, ages 5 and up]

A Different Pond by Bao Phi, illustrated by Thi Bui

A Hmong man is included in this story as a side character so I’ve included it in this list.

This is a gentle story that touches on more serious subjects. A boy and his father go on an early morning fishing trip but they fish for dinner not for sport. The boy asks his father why they need to fish since his father works two jobs. Fishing also reminds his father of his brother, another sad subject touched on since his brother who fought by his side in the Vietnam war never returned. This quiet story is like the pond itself, tranquil on top but teeming with possibilities including life or death underneath. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

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Diverse Children's Books

#DiverseKidLit Linky

Welcome to #DiverseKidLit ! Please join us in sharing your diverse children’s book links and resources, as well as visiting other links to find great suggestions and recommendations.

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

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How to Protect Your Kid's Eyes - 5 Trusty Tips

How to Protect Your Kid’s Eyes – 5 Trusty Tips

So, you’re raising a reader! And the good news is that your child loves to read. The not-so-good news? With the rise of the digital age, a large portion of our reading is now done on digital eBook devices. Laptops, iPads, smartphones, and other tablets all conspire to give us digital eye strain or computer vision syndrome. Is there anything a parent, educator, or caregiver can do to protect children’s eyes? You betcha! Read on for 5 tips from the experts.

  1. Evaluate their vision.

Have you noticed your child squinting at text? Does he or she seem to hold the books closer to his or her face than necessary? Does he or she complain of tired eyes? Even if these symptoms are not present, when was the last time your child went for an eye checkup? The American Optometric Association recommends that children between the ages of 6 to 18 go for annual eye checkups. Getting glasses to prevent eyestrain is a smart move that could encourage hesitant readers. In fact, eyestrain or poor vision could be what has been holding your child back from fully entering the wonderful world of reading.

  1. Balance plays a role.

Too many hours spent with eyes glued to a screen is not good for the eyes. Eye muscles get fatigued, just as other muscles do in our body. Other symptoms of overuse? When your child complains of dry, irritated, or sensitive eyes. Wearing a pair of computer glasses like those offered by Felix Gray will combat these symptoms by filtering blue light and eliminating glare from screens, the two main culprits of digital eye strain.

But there are also other secondary effects to eye strain that contribute to poor health habits. In a report published by CNN, it was found that the average American spends 10 hours in front of a screen. The statistics for children might be different, as where an adult likely uses a laptop for work, a child will be in a classroom. So, while the hours in front of a screen might be less for a child, compared to an adult’s, those hours mean less time a child could be outside, playing. Being active when young is an important habit for kids to establish that will help them avoid becoming overweight later in life.

Help your child avoid eyestrain by making sure your child is also going outside and playing. And that he or she has an active life outside of screen-based entertainment. Read more…

Mia Wenjen Motherhood Unplugged Summit 2.0

Join Me for FREE Event: Motherhood Unplugged 2.0

I’m so thrilled to be part of Motherhood Unplugged 2,.o Summit, and I have a FREE ticket for you to join me at this online event. You can register using this link >> here.

Mia Wenjen Motherhood Unplugged Summit 2.0

Meet the 20+ Mums reclaiming motherhood 2.0 for this generation: health, happiness and time

Motherhood Unplugged 2.0 Summit

Date: 5th November 2017
Where: Online @home @office @onthego

Motherhood Unplugged 2.0 Summit Read more…

Funny Asian Fractured Fairy Tales

Funny Asian Fractured Fairy Tales

Funny fractured fairy tales are my jam, especially if you add in an Asian twist. What books have I left out? Thanks for your suggestions!

Funny Asian Fractured Fairy Tales

Ninja Red Riding Hood by Corey Rosen Swartz, illustrated by Dan Santat

The three little pigs started a ninja school and now the wolf can’t catch any prey. He joins the dojo to get some fighting skills and then goes out into the wood where he finds Little Red Riding Hood. Turns out she went to ninja school too. Because he can’t defeat Ninja Red, the wolf decides to go vegetarian and takes up yoga instead. There is also The Three Ninja Pigs, and Hansel and Gretel Ninja Chicks in this fun series.[picture book, ages 4 and up]

Goldy Luck and the Three Pandas by Natasha Yim, illustrated by Grace Zong

In this riff on Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Goldy Luck is a Chinese American girl who upsets her panda family neighbors. She eats their congee, sits in their chairs, and messes up their beds. Her conscience gets to her and she returns to make amends, just in time to help the pandas celebrate Chinese New Year. This is a fun picture book for kids to compare with the original fairy tale. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Read more…