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Lao and Hmong Children's Books

Lao and Hmong Children’s Books

It’s clear to me when trying to create this list that there are not enough Lao and Hmong children’s books out there! They were hard to come by even through my public library system so I purchased Lao Folktales and The Hemp and the Beeswax: A Hmong Cinderella. If you need either for your home or classroom library, please leave me a comment about why you need it and I’ll send them to you.

How about you? Do you have any book suggestions for this list? They would be most welcome. Thank you!

 

Mali Under the Night Sky: A Lao Story of Home by Youme Landowne

This is the true story of Laotian American artist Malichansouk Kouanchao, whose family was forced by civil war to flee Laos when she was five. Mali lived an idyllic life in the country with her family until the war began. Forced to flee, Mali and her family are arrested for not having a home in this country. With her childhood memories to sustain her, Mali tells stories of home to her fellow refugees. [picture book, ages 5 and up]

A Different Pond by Bao Phi, illustrated by Thi Bui

A Hmong man is included in this story as a side character so I’ve included it in this list.

This is a gentle story that touches on more serious subjects. A boy and his father go on an early morning fishing trip but they fish for dinner not for sport. The boy asks his father why they need to fish since his father works two jobs. Fishing also reminds his father of his brother, another sad subject touched on since his brother who fought by his side in the Vietnam war never returned. This quiet story is like the pond itself, tranquil on top but teeming with possibilities including life or death underneath. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

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Diverse Children's Books

#DiverseKidLit Linky

Welcome to #DiverseKidLit ! Please join us in sharing your diverse children’s book links and resources, as well as visiting other links to find great suggestions and recommendations.

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

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How to Protect Your Kid's Eyes - 5 Trusty Tips

How to Protect Your Kid’s Eyes – 5 Trusty Tips

So, you’re raising a reader! And the good news is that your child loves to read. The not-so-good news? With the rise of the digital age, a large portion of our reading is now done on digital eBook devices. Laptops, iPads, smartphones, and other tablets all conspire to give us digital eye strain or computer vision syndrome. Is there anything a parent, educator, or caregiver can do to protect children’s eyes? You betcha! Read on for 5 tips from the experts.

  1. Evaluate their vision.

Have you noticed your child squinting at text? Does he or she seem to hold the books closer to his or her face than necessary? Does he or she complain of tired eyes? Even if these symptoms are not present, when was the last time your child went for an eye checkup? The American Optometric Association recommends that children between the ages of 6 to 18 go for annual eye checkups. Getting glasses to prevent eyestrain is a smart move that could encourage hesitant readers. In fact, eyestrain or poor vision could be what has been holding your child back from fully entering the wonderful world of reading.

  1. Balance plays a role.

Too many hours spent with eyes glued to a screen is not good for the eyes. Eye muscles get fatigued, just as other muscles do in our body. Other symptoms of overuse? When your child complains of dry, irritated, or sensitive eyes. Wearing a pair of computer glasses like those offered by Felix Gray will combat these symptoms by filtering blue light and eliminating glare from screens, the two main culprits of digital eye strain.

But there are also other secondary effects to eye strain that contribute to poor health habits. In a report published by CNN, it was found that the average American spends 10 hours in front of a screen. The statistics for children might be different, as where an adult likely uses a laptop for work, a child will be in a classroom. So, while the hours in front of a screen might be less for a child, compared to an adult’s, those hours mean less time a child could be outside, playing. Being active when young is an important habit for kids to establish that will help them avoid becoming overweight later in life.

Help your child avoid eyestrain by making sure your child is also going outside and playing. And that he or she has an active life outside of screen-based entertainment. Read more…

Mia Wenjen Motherhood Unplugged Summit 2.0

Join Me for FREE Event: Motherhood Unplugged 2.0

I’m so thrilled to be part of Motherhood Unplugged 2,.o Summit, and I have a FREE ticket for you to join me at this online event. You can register using this link >> here.

Mia Wenjen Motherhood Unplugged Summit 2.0

Meet the 20+ Mums reclaiming motherhood 2.0 for this generation: health, happiness and time

Motherhood Unplugged 2.0 Summit

Date: 5th November 2017
Where: Online @home @office @onthego

Motherhood Unplugged 2.0 Summit Read more…

Funny Asian Fractured Fairy Tales

Funny Asian Fractured Fairy Tales

Funny fractured fairy tales are my jam, especially if you add in an Asian twist. What books have I left out? Thanks for your suggestions!

Funny Asian Fractured Fairy Tales

Ninja Red Riding Hood by Corey Rosen Swartz, illustrated by Dan Santat

The three little pigs started a ninja school and now the wolf can’t catch any prey. He joins the dojo to get some fighting skills and then goes out into the wood where he finds Little Red Riding Hood. Turns out she went to ninja school too. Because he can’t defeat Ninja Red, the wolf decides to go vegetarian and takes up yoga instead. There is also The Three Ninja Pigs, and Hansel and Gretel Ninja Chicks in this fun series.[picture book, ages 4 and up]

Goldy Luck and the Three Pandas by Natasha Yim, illustrated by Grace Zong

In this riff on Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Goldy Luck is a Chinese American girl who upsets her panda family neighbors. She eats their congee, sits in their chairs, and messes up their beds. Her conscience gets to her and she returns to make amends, just in time to help the pandas celebrate Chinese New Year. This is a fun picture book for kids to compare with the original fairy tale. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

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fish Glass Blowing with My Girls

My Girls Learn Glass Blowing

My daughters fell in love with glass blowing after going to the Chihuly exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts a few years ago. They wanted to learn how to blow glass and there is a glass blowing school (Diablo Glass) near the museum, but, of course, it was booked solid for a year after the show.
Chihuly

Chihuly at Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Photo from TripAdvisor.

We waited a year and tried again, and they both got a spot for a week long camp during the summer. It was a hot summer, as I recall. This is pertinent because the furnace for glass blowing is 800 degrees Fahrenheit, and they had to wear long sleeve t-shirts and pants for protection.

Glass Blowing with My GirlsGrasshopper and Sensei makes a seahorse working with hot glass and a blow torch. Read more…

Honey Lemon Ginger Tea and Honey Lemon cough drops

Honey Lemon Ginger Tea to Beat Cold and Flu Season

Tracking Pixel

I’ve teamed up with Star Market to share how my family deals with cold and flu season.

Have cold and flu season hit your family yet? We’ve already had our first round of colds, coinciding with our first week back to school. It’s not the best time to miss school!

Honey Lemon Ginger Tea and Honey Lemon cough drops

I find that tinctures — old fashioned teas steeped with herbs and fruit — help my kids beat a cold. The teas help to flush their system with fluids and the warmth soothes their dry sore throats. They also feel cared for. I’m sharing our Honey Lemon Ginger Tea recipe — it as easy to make as lemonade. Read more…

NaPiBoWriWee: My 7 Picture Books

NaPiBoWriWee: My 7 Picture Books

NaPiBoWriWee week was last month, and I attempted to write seven picture books in seven days. That didn’t go so well, but I did manage to write three picture books, edit two picture book manuscripts that I had written a few weeks earlier, and come up with four new picture book ideas.

I think that’s the point of NaPiBoWriWee week … even if you don’t hit your goal of writing seven picture books in seven weeks, you are much closer to your goal by just attempting it.

NAPIBOWRIWEE event

Next year, I will actually do some work prior to NaPiBoWriWee week so that I’ll have seven picture book ideas already conceived, with notes and research for each book. This is probably the only way I can actually pull off seven picture books in seven day.  Read more…

Native American Folklore by Native Americans

Native American Folklore & Creation Stories by Native Americans

You might have missed the drama caused when Nancy Bo Flood was invited to join the “Indigenous Experience in Children’s Literature” panel. Native American children’s book blogger, Debbie Reese objected:

“As regular readers of AICL know, I’ve been studying the ways Native peoples are depicted in children’s literature for decades. In that time, I’ve come to know the work of many people who–like Flood–are not Native, but write books about Native peoples. Amongst that body of White writers, there are many instances in which the writer has done particularly egregious things.”

Her objection is well said. The United States was founded on Native American genocide, with their lands taken away, their treaties violated, and their cultural heritage stolen through forced a boarding school system. In my opinion, it’s not right that their stories are stolen or “retold” by non-Native Americans unless there is explicit permission from the specific tribe.

To the best of my ability, I make this Native American folklore list as part of my Folk Tales series with books by just Native American authors. What am I missing? Thanks for your help.

p.s. My other Folk Tales posts include:

24 Wonderful Chinese Folk Tales for Kids

15 Great Korean Folk Tales for Kids

Filipino Folk Tales

21 Wonderful Japanese Folk Tales for Kids

Hawaiian Folk Tales and Children’s Books

 

Native American Folklore & Creation Stories by Native Americans

Beaver Steals Fire: A Salish Coyote Story told by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, illustrated by Sam Sandoval

“This story represents thousands of years of oral tradition. In Beaver Steals Fire, fire is a gift from the Creator brought by the animal beings for human beings who are yet to come.” from Acknowledgements

“For those who use this book in the classroom, this story should be read or discussed only during winter when snow in on the ground. The elders usually bring out the stories in November and put them away again when the snow is gone. It is said that snakes will come to those who do not follow this custom or that cold weather will come during the warm months.” from A Note to the Reader

Since I do not want to disrespect the Salish and Kootenai traditions, and this is July, I am not reading the book as snow is not on the ground here in Boston and I certainly don’t wish for cold weather to come sooner than it already does. Please enjoy this book at the first snowfall. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Crossing Bok Chitto: A Choctaw Tale of Friendship & Freedom by Tim Tingle (a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma), illustrated by Jeanne Rorex Bridges (an artist of Cherokee ancestry)

Crossing Bok Chitto is a tribute to the Choctaws — and Cherokees and Creeks and Chickasaws and Seminoles — and Indians of every nation who aided the runaway people of bondage. from A Note on Choctaw Storytelling in the backmatter

In the days before the Trail of Tears, the river Bok Chitto was a boundary, separating the Choctaws from the Mississippi plantation owners. This river was the line between slavery and freedom for their slaves. When Martha Tom, a young Choctaw crossed the river in search of blackberries, she met Little Mo, a young black slave who helps her find her way home. Their friendship continued as the years passed, Martha Tom crossing Bok Chitto on her way to church and sitting with Little Mo’s family. When Little Mo’s mother was to be sold, Little Mo had a plan. His family, with the help of the Choctaws, would cross to freedom. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Following the singing of the Treaty of the Dancing Rabbit Creek in September of 1830, the government forced thousands of Choctaws from their homes in Mississippi. The Choctaws began the trek to Indian Territory, thus becoming the first travelers on the Trail of Tears. from Choctaws Today: Two Properous Nations, One Strong People in the backmatter

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