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How To: Parent an ADD Child

How to Parent an ADD Child without Drugs

This is a great article from the SF Gate, home of the San Fransico Chronicle, by  Jessica Werner Zack.  Zach writes about Pulitzer-prize winning journalist, Katherine Ellison — herself undiagnosed with ADD until recently — and her struggles and successes in parenting her ADD son.  Ellison’s book, Buzz:  A Year of Paying Attention,  chronicles her experiences including ultimately how she chose mindful parenting over meds.

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NYTimes Best Seller Picture Book Sequel

The Pout-Pout Fish in the Big-Big Dark Delights

It is a rare occasion when my husband raves about a picture book.  He’s read his fair share of picture books to our three children but bedtime stories is my favorite time of the day, not his.  And while he will read a book over and over again, there aren’t too many picture books in our house that he is excited to re-read.

The Pout-Pout Fish in the Big-Big Dark, Deborah Diesen, http://PragmaticMom.com, Pragmatic Mom

So when he told ME to blog about this book because it’s GREAT, I have to say that I stood up at attention (figuratively as I was reclined in bed), and took note.  This is why I think he liked it so much:

  • It rhymes.  And it rhymes beautifully without losing its cadence somewhere in the story which is my pet peeve in life.
  • It has a particular part that repeats several times — when the Pout-Pout fish admits he is scared of the dark.  My husband and youngest LOVED to say the first three lines loud and strong, and the scared-y cat part high and squeaky.  They are just like that!  But it cracked them up to no end!  And this book helped my son because he, too, is afraid of the dark.
  • There are several great messages woven into the book:  being a good friend, overcoming your fears, and being helpful.
  • There is also an oceanography lesson built in.  (My husband grew up in Monterey, California and though I actually took Ichthyology (the study of fish!) in college, he knows way more about marine biology than I do just from osmosis).  He noticed that the sea creatures changed appropriately as the fish swam deeper into the ocean.  I actually learned about the different levels of the sea from Dr. Seuss’ Wish on a Fish:  All About Sea Creatures myself and also appreciated the weird and crazy looking fish at the bottom of the ocean in the trench.
  • His only criticism was that he didn’t love the illustrations by Dan Hanna.  They are ok; not terrible but just not Caldecott worthy.   That’s a shame because this a New York Times best selling author!

This is the first book that I’ve read by Deborah Diesen but I am so impressed that I’m going to find her other books.

The Pout Pout Fish, Deborah Diesen, http://PragmaticMom.com, Pragmatic MomWish on a Fish, Dr. Seuss, http://PragmaticMom.com, Pragmatic Mom

To examine any book at Amazon, please just click on the image of the book.

5 Fun and Safe Social Networks for Children

Safe Social Networks for Kids

This is a very helpful post by Sarah Kessler on Mashable.  I feel like I am just starting to understand Social Media networks for myself but I have no idea what is out there and safe for my kids who are now clamoring to blog, get their own email accounts, and create websites.  I’m all for that, but I just want them to be safe.  Thanks Sarah!  Your information was exactly what I needed for myself! Read more…

Half of ADHD Boys and Girls Have Reading Disability

Reading Disability Risk High in Girls With ADHD

The study, which looked at more than 5,000 Minnesota youth, found that children with ADHD have dramatically higher rates of reading disabilities than youth without the disorder. The incidence of reading disabilities among boys with ADHD was 51 percent, and among girls it was 46.7 percent. For boys without ADHD, the reading disability rate among the study participants was 14.5 percent; among girls it was 7.7 percent.

This is from Christina Samuels of EducationWeek: Reading Disability Risk In Girls With ADHD

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Top 10: Best Native American Picture Books

Debbie Reese, Pre-Eminent Scholar, Picks Best Native American Picture Books

I am so excited to find these books lists by pre-eminent Native American Children’s Literature scholar, Debbie Reese.  This is the first list for picture books and I will add the ones for Middle School and High School soon.  She has a wonderful website, American Indians in Children’s Literature.  Her bio: Read more…

Girl Bullying On the Rise? Hannah Montana to Blame

Why is Girl Bullying on the Rise?

Girl bullying is every parents’ worst nightmare.  Parents of tormented girls have it the worst, but parents of bullies must be equally uncomfortable, I would imagine, once they figure out that their little girl is needlessly cruel.  Even parents of the passive girls — the vast majority — who stand around witnessing bullying but helpless to intervene feel frustration as the tales of bullying pour forth.  At least that is what it seems like to me. Read more…

Outstanding Children’s Literature like the Newbery!

Best Books for Kids: Carnegie Medal Winners

I had to look up the Carnegie Medal in Literature Award in Wikipedia.  It’s another version of the Newbery with an accompanying award, the Kate Greenaway Medal for Illustration, aping the Caldecott.  It’s all good to me but surprisingly, there is not a ton of overlap between the Newbery /Carnegie or the Caldecott/Kate Greenaway.  There are plenty of great books out there that deserve awards so please check out this list if you are searching for more great books! Read more…

Picture Books No Longer a Staple for Children?!

Are Picture Books Still Popular?

Is this a sign of the recessionary times or a shift in reading?  I hope it’s just the recession because I LOVE picture books and this article from Julie Bosman at The New York Times just makes me and my Dad Friend sad!

I will do my part.  I just bought Jon Scieszka‘s Math Curse.  Now I think I will buy Robot Zot next.  Even if you are not buying picture books, please read them to your children!  Get them from the school library, the public library, a yard sale, or do book trades with mom friends.  Picture books are for any age; they are a complete story with a beginning, middle and end.  The illustrations help to tell the story.  Picture books often have rich and vivid language making it a more interesting experience than some repetitive, mindless, easy chapter books (Rainbow Fairies come to mind here but you fill in the blank with your pet peeve series). Read more…

2011 Newbery Potential Winners from Ex-Newbery Judge, Amanda Stuckmeyer

Predicting Newbery Winners 2011

I am excited about the upcoming Newbery Awards!  Amanda Struckmeyer served on the Newbery Committee that selected Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book and her list, I believe, is dead on.  Here’s a link to the post that has her Mock Newbery event.  But more importantly, here’s her list!  Maybe your children will have fun reading these books trying to predict the outcome of this year’s Newbery Award?  If that is not a reasonable option, then just enjoy some newly published quality books.  Check with your library also to see if they are available yet.  If you only want one book suggestion, pundits from KidLitCon 2010 have whispered in my ear about how excellent The Keeper by Kathi Appelt is.  I wonder if Vegas lets you bet on this? Read more…