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Multicultural Children's Book Day 2017 Update

Multicultural Children’s Book Day Update!

MCBD Sponsorship has officially closed so we are ready to share the final line-up along with a few “FAQ’s”

  1. MCBD is a non-profit that is in its fourth year
  2. Our official hashtag is #ReadYourWorld.
  3. MCBD was created by Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom
  4. The Big Giant Linky: The much anticipated review linky will not be live until the morning of 1/27/17 and will be located here on the MCBD site and also on all CoHosts’ sites. This link-up is a compilation of 400+ books multicultural book reviews and activities that will create a robust online resource for parents, grandparents, educators, caregivers and librarians. A separate Linky will be available for those reviewing on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube.
  5. MCBD offers many FREE resources for those looking for information on diverse books for young readers including our Classroom Kindness Kit and our Diversity Book Lists & Activities for Teachers and Parents.
  6. Our 17 CoHosts are made up of powerhouse moms, bloggers, writers and reading advocates. Our CoHosts are:

A Crafty Arab, All Done Monkey, Books My Kids Read, Crafty Moms Share, Colours of Us, Educators Spin on it, Franticmommy, Growing Book by Book, Imagination Soup, Kid World Citizen, Mama Smiles, Multicultural Kid Blogs, Randomly Reading, Spanish Playground, The Jenny Evolution,The Logonauts and Youth Literature Reviews

Multicultural Children’s Book Day‘s mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in home and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents and educators. Read more…

Chinese New Year Books Instead of Tiki Tiki Tembo

Chinese New Year Books Instead of Tiki Tiki Tembo

I have to say that I’ve read Tiki Tiki Tembo to my kids so many times that we all can say his long version name. I just wanted to suggest other books for Chinese New Year because it’s kind of a fake Chinese Folk Tale about why Chinese names are so short today. For kids who might not have a lot of exposure to China, Chinese Americans and/or Chinese Culture, it sets the wrong tone, implying that the Chinese are foolish and stupid.

Grace Lin’s blog has more:

  • The book purports to be an “old Chinese folktale,” but it is not. It is actually thought to be based on a Japanese folktale called Jugemu. Presumably, that tale was picked up and retold by Westerners, who mistakenly attributed it to China and added to the story. The result is a story that is neither Japanese nor Chinese, and it exemplifies the racist attitude of, “Chinese, Japanese, what’s the difference, they’re all the same.” from Wikipedia
  • Though the book’s illustrations are beautifully drawn by Caldecott Medal-winning artist Blair Lent, they do not authentically depict Chinese people, as noted by The Multiculturalist above. Tikki Tikki Tembo’s shoes are actually strikingly similar to traditional Japanese geta footwear, again reinforcing the inaccurate perception that all Asian cultures are the same.

Read more…

How To Get Your Book Noticed: Marketing for Authors

How To Get Your Book Noticed: Marketing for Authors

I recently got an email from a new author asking for advice on how to get her book noticed. I wrote her a short reply about The Long Road and The Immediate Fix. Then I got to thinking that I really didn’t cover it enough so I thought I’d try to tackle that today.

First of all, I will say that while I am a marketer with an M.B.A. from UCLA’s Anderson Graduate School of Business in Entrepreneurial Marketing, and I started a company, Aquent (renamed from MacTemps), out of college that landed on the Inc. 500 Fastest Growing Private Company six years later at the #12 spot, I have never worked in children’s book publishing nor marketed a book.

Aquent

I do, however, know how to get bloggers to notice your book, from the backwards perspective of publishers, PR folks, and authors asking me to cover their book. And I also I think that building the brand of YOU, THE AUTHOR, is not so different from building a blog following. Over the past seven years, I built a blog audience of 100,000+ page views a month, and a social media following:

I have a Twitter following of 76,900

My Pinterest following is 143,700

My Facebook network is 6,400 (personal and PragmaticMom)

My Google + network is 11,200

My Instagram following is 7,600

My LinkedIn connections total over 3,500

and I can share with you my learnings and takeaways.

So read on if you want my 2 cents …

First of all, I noticed that publishers don’t spent a ton of time or money on most authors. Sure, if you are Rick Riordan, they go crazy with a huge marketing campaign, but for most authors, it seems to be about a three week campaign. And here’s why …

Think about how many books publishers launch each year. And when they reach out to bloggers, the emails asking for coverage can feel like too many times to the well. Bloggers like myself stop reading and responding to these requests. Blog tours get harder to set up. You see where this is going … publishers want authors to set up their own blog tours. It’s because that a personal request from an author is going to get noticed a lot more than a mass email from a publisher or a PR firm.

Marketing for books  is generally a “set piece” comprised of:

  • Advertising (consumer, trade, school, library)
  • PR (bloggers, publications)
  • ARC distribution
  • Promotions (Goodreads, school and library conferences, trade shows)
  • Author appearances (school visits, book store events, conference events)

Authors get a budget based on how many books they are expected to sell. ARCS and advertising are hard costs. PR and outreach are staff time, and I am guessing most likely email blasts to internal lists. Read more…

Diverse Children's Books

#DiverseKidLit Linky: Human Rights!

Happy New Year!

Our theme for January is Human Rights. (As always, the theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

I wanted to share with you a great discovery: a  novel in verse that tells the story of quiet heroes of the Civil Rights Movement.

Loving vs. Virginia: A Documentary Novel of the Landmark Civil Rights Case by Patricia Hruby Powell, illustrated by  Shadra Strickland

2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark case that made mixed race marriages legal. That Richard and Mildred’s very last name is “LOVING” and that their crime is loving each other says something about fate perhaps.

In 1955, in Virginia — state slogan: Virginia is for Lovers (formerly Virginia is for history lovers)– two teenagers fell in love amidst segregation, racism and cruelty. Their marriage broke a Virginia 1924 law to preserve racial integrity and keep children of partial white ancestry out of all white schools. The fact that this law implied that one race was superior to another — this legislation allowed Negroes to marry those of other races, thus subjecting them to losing their racial purity — was an inconsistency that won their case.

It took nine long years during which they lived in exile in Washington DC for them to win their case. Told in mesmerizing free verse that makes you feel like you’ve stepped back in time, this chapter book is as important as their landmark case. [Novel in verse, ages 8 and up.]

p.s. If you want more background, I have this post on my Instagram.

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

Read more…

Diverse Minds HS Writing Challenge: $5000 Prizes

Diverse Minds HS Writing Challenge: $5000 Prizes

For High School Students in the following areas:Washington, D.C. Metro Area, Southern New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and New York

Diverse Minds Writing Challenge

Now celebrating its 11th Anniversary!

This innovative competition asks high school students, in each region, to write and illustrate a children’s book that tells a story of tolerance, diversity or inclusion.

Students currently enrolled in the 9th – 12th grades are eligible to participate. The first place-winning individual or team will receive a college scholarship of $5,000, and B’nai B’rith will professionally publish the winning submission – making the student a published author! Submissions placing second and third will also receive scholarships.

In addition, the teacher of the student(s) who place first will receive a $1,000 stipend and the school will receive a $500 grant. The submission deadline for DC/Delmarva and New Jersey will be March 18, 2017.

Diverse Minds HS Writing Challenge: $5000 Prizes

Read more…

FREE Classroom Kindness Kit from Multicultural Children's Book Day

FREE Classroom Kindness Kit from Multicultural Children’s Book Day

Now more than ever, a message of hope, compassion, empathy and understanding is needed.

Now more than ever, we need to come together as a nation of beautifully diverse people and encourage and implement KINDESS.

Kindness is word that many of us are hearing more and more thanks to a concerning, tense and sometimes scary 2016. It something we all as humans need to be mindful or especially when it comes to being role models for kids. As always, encouraging and teaching kindness to children starts at home and in the classroom.

Powerhouse Children’s Publishing Company, Scholastic, has noted that books and activities that promote kindness will be a key trend in 2017…

Kindness Classroom Kit

Read more…

Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2017

Multicultural Children’s Book Day Sponsorships Closing Jan 6th!

The prep of the upcoming Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2017 (1/27/17) is humming right along! In case you’ve missed all the details, Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom are teaming up for the fourth year to raise awareness on the ongoing need to include kid’s books that celebrate diversity in home and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents and educators.

BUT, ALL Sponsorship levels will be CLOSING on January 6, 2017!

Read more…

10 Multicultural Books For Kids Ages 2-14

10 Multicultural Books For Kids Ages 2-14

Thank you to Ronna Mandel (who also blogs at Good Reads with Ronna) for doing a story on me and Multicultural Children’s Book Day for JLife. This is the book list that I created for the article.

10 Multicultural Books To Read With Your Kids

1. It’s Okay to Be Different by Todd Parr

Todd Parr’s message of inclusion and acceptance is perfect for preschool and up. [picture book, ages 2 and up]

2. Never Say a Mean Word Again by Jacqueline Jules

Jewish poet Samuel Ha-Grid was the highest royal advisor in Muslim Granada, and this story references his wisdom in conflict resolution. It’s retold here through the eyes of two boys; one Muslim, one Jewish. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Read more…

Top 10: Favorite Diversity Books from Kid Book Reviewer

Top 10: Favorite Diversity Books from Kid Book Reviewer

I am so excited to have kid book bloggers, Oscar and Olivia, here today with their 10 Favorite Diversity Books for Kids. They’ve included both picture books and chapter books. Oscar is 9 years old; Olivia 12 years old. They blog collaboratively at Kid Book Review. Please check out their great blog! You can also find them on Twitter, Google+, Instagram, Goodreads, and Bloglovin’.

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My brother (Oscar, age 9) and I (Olivia, age 12), have a book blog called Kid Book Reviewer where we review books and interview our favorite authors.

Our Top Ten Favorite Diversity Books for Kids

Being Jewish, we love reading books about other cultures, races, or religions. This children’s genre – called Diversity books – is quickly picking up speed and becoming more and more popular. Here’s a list of our Top Ten favorite Diversity Books.

1. I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai
Olivia is a huge fan of Malala Yousafzai, especially after reading her book, I Am Malala. In Malala’s empowering story, she recounts how she stood up to the Taliban and fought for a girl’s right to education. Readers are gripped as Malala ultimately ends up putting her life in danger, but shows immense persistence when she continues fighting – and still is. A heart-wrenching, inspiring book that is a must-read for all kids – especially girls. [chapter book, ages 12 and up]

Read more…