All posts in Multicultural Books for Kids

Durga Puja and the Festivals of India

Durga Puja and the Festivals of India

Shoumi Sen Diwali

Please welcome Shoumi Sen who is guest posting for me today. She’s the author of Celebrate Durga Puja With Me! Her book celebrates an important festival of India, Durga Puja, which is about the Mother Goddess, and the victory of the revered warrior Goddess Durga over the evil buffalo demon Mahishasura. Like Chinese New Year, families buy new clothes, prepare special food, and spend the day with friends and loved ones. Durga Puja begins today, September 30th!

Celebrate Durga Puja With Me! by Shoumi Sen

Learn about a festival of India, Durga Puja, in this colorful rhyming picture book. [picture book, ages 4 and up]


Shoumi will tell us more about Durga Puja and the other Festivals of India.

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The Festivals of India

Indian society celebrates many festivals and an internet search for ‘Festivals of India’ will invariably result in a long list! India is a diverse nation – her people speak many different languages and practice different religions. People here are spiritual and fun loving and the myriad of festivals fill up the months from January to December. There are religious festivals like Diwali, Holi, Christmas and Eid, seasonal festivals like Onam, Baisakhi, Makar Sankranti and Lohri and national festivals like Republic Day and Independence Day. Here are four popular festivals; this list is but a fraction of the many that are celebrated throughout the year!

Holi – The Festival of Colors

 Holi celebrationsRead more…

Beautiful Barefoot Books

Beautiful Barefoot Books

I love the message Barefoot Books newest title, The Barefoot Book of Children. It’s about opening the hearts and minds of children to spark their curiosity to learn about people around the world. It’s about examining differences to find connections and similarities, thus discovering the humanity in each and every person.

Author Kate DePalma and senior editor at Barefoot Books would like to thank you personally for learning more about The Barefoot Book of Children.

The Barefoot Book of Children by Tessa Strickland and Kate DePalma, illustrated by David Dean

What can you see or hear or smell from where you are?

Which [languages] do you recognize?

Does [your name] have a meaning?

With gentle questions, this beautifully illustrated book helps kids see their place in the world as well as make connections to others who are different from them. It’s a book to encourage children to ask questions about how children live around the world. Each illustration vignette shows a child from a different culture but doing similar things: taking a bath, in their special getaway place, at a place of worship, and in their own home. Pair this book with the World Atlas. [large format picture book, ages 2 and up]

bfb-of_children_hc_3d_web_400px Read more…

Diverse Children's Books

Favorite Bilingual Books at #DiverseKidLit Linky

Thanks for joining us for #DiverseKidLit linky! Here’s my pick for favorite bilingual picture book:

Mamá The Alien/Mamá la Extraterrestre by Rene Colato Lainez, illustrated by Laura Lacamara

Our theme for today’s Diverse Children’s Books linkup is Favorite Bilingual Book(s). What are your favorite children’s books in two or more languages? (The theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?


Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

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#ReadYourWorld vs #WeNeedDiverseBooks

#ReadYourWorld vs #WeNeedDiverseBooks

Valarie and I are gearing up for Multicultural Children’s Book Day on January 27th, 2017, so I thought this might be a good time to explain what I perceive to be the differences between two different but similar groups: Multicultural Children’s Book Day and We Need Diverse Books.

In a business analogy, one is a scrappy start-up. The other is a well-funded corporate entity, though, both organizations, in fact, are non-profits.

Let’s start at the beginning (a very good place to start)…

When Did It All Begin?

Multicultural Children's Book Day

Multicultural Children’s Book Day was conceived in the August of 2013. Valarie saw that I was re-focusing my efforts on promoting diversity books in response to Lee and Low’s report that the number of children’s books of a diverse nature has not changed over the last fourteen years, and asked me if I wanted to join her in starting a holiday to promote .  Our first event was Multicultural Children’s Book Day on January 27th, 2014 where we raised about $3k. We used this money for a part-time admin and to set up a non-profit and a website. Our revenues have doubled every year, allowing us to give away more books.

We Need Diverse Books

We Need Diverse Books started in April 2014 by young adult author Ellen Oh. They ran a successful Indigogo campaign that raised $333k in 2014. Their event is a forthcoming Diversity Children’s and YA Book Tradeshow Conference.

Read more…

12 Amazing NEW Diversity Picture Books

12 Amazing NEW Diversity Picture Books

I’ve been collecting piles of new picture books and these twelve diverse picks stood out to me. How about you? What new diversity, multicultural, and inclusive picture books are you enjoying? Thanks for sharing!

Diversity Picture Book Most Likely To Win a Caldecott

Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie, illustrated by Yuyi Morales

Sherman Alexie’s first picture book reflects on his Spokane Native American tradition of getting a new name to mark the transition to adulthood. There are 500 federally recognized tribal nations in the United States, each with its own diversity of language, ceremonies, and naming. To respect the deeper meaning of the naming, classroom activities where kids pick their own Indian names are not recommended as it is not culturally sensitive. This is a delightful picture book sure to engage kids. The vibrant illustrations by Caldecott illustrator Yuyi Morales perfectly match the story. [picture book, ages 4 and up]


Read more…

The Nian Monster

Cover Reveal: THE NIAN MONSTER

Today I’m thrilled to reveal the cover of a new great Chinese New Year picture book, The Nian Monster, by my guest author is Andrea Wang. I have more Chinese New Year picture books, new and improved Chinese New Year picture book list, and a Lunar New Year picture book list by author Janet Wong too. If you need Chinese New Year crafts and activities, I have a round up too!

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I am so excited to share the cover of my debut picture book, The Nian Monster! Actually, I’m not just excited, I’m queyue, which in Chinese means “to frolic for joy,” or more literally, “to jump like a sparrow.” So picture me hopping, fluttering, and chirping, “Look! Look!”

The Nian Monster Read more…

Top 10: Bilingual Spanish Picture Books

Top 10: Bilingual Spanish Picture Books

This is my third bilingual Spanish book list. Author Derek Taylor Kent wrote the first one. The second bilingual Spanish picture book list is from illustrator Wendy Martin. Today’s list is my own, the result of a pile of bilingual books that I’ve been saving for six months, and the books I read to create a Mexico picture book list.

What bilingual Spanish books do you recommend? Thanks for sharing!

Bilingual Spanish Picture Books Hot of the Press!

Marisol McDonald and the Monster by Monica Brown, illustrated by Sara Palacios

Marisol McDonald likes being mismatched but she doesn’t like monsters. After hearing a noise under her bed, she’s certain there’s a monster there. She figures out her own solution to her phobia, but it turns out that the noise has a more prosaic explanation. And now, she has two companions under her bed at night. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Mama the Alien by René Colato Laínez, illustrated by Laura Lacámara

It’s a case of mistaken identity. Sofia finds Mamá’s identification card in her purse and discovers that she’s an alien. Sofia now believes that she’s half alien and gets to work to figure out what this might mean. What language does an alien speak? Will space ships land in her yard? Does she have hidden alien body parts? Finally, her parents realize what Sofia thinks and explain their reason for celebration. Mamá is becoming a citizen! Her old card was a Resident Alien card, which has been renamed Permanent Resident. This a humorous picture book to discuss the process of Naturalization with kids. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Top 10: Bilingual Spanish Picture Books

10. Olinguito, from A to Z! by Lulu Delacre

Join a zoologist in the cloud forest as he searches for the elusive olinguito. The Spanish version showcases alliteration, while the English version tells an alphabet story of the animals in the enchanted forest of Ecuador. Together, both reader and scientist discover a new species of raccoon-like carnivores … the olinguito! [picture book, ages 2 and up]

Read more…

10 Great Picture Books To Learn About Africa

10 Great Picture Books to Learn About Africa

When my kids studied Ghana in 2nd grade, one frustration for their teachers was that the kids had impression of Ghana as a rural environment. They didn’t really get to experience or understand that Ghana also has cities. I wasn’t able to find enough books on Ghana to make a book list, so I’ve included picture books set in The Gambia, Mauritania, Malawi, Kenya, Ghana, Uganda, and Tanzania on a variety of diversity themes.

What books on Africa do you recommend? Thanks for sharing!

10. Boundless Grace by Mary Hoffman, illustrated by Caroline Binch

Grace’s parents are divorced and her father moves to Africa where he re-marries and starts another family. Grace is nervous to go all the way to The Gambia with her grandmother; it’s so different from what she knows. There are sheep the roadside and the market is filled with open air stalls. Though she feels like she doesn’t fit in at first, her step family is kind to her. She realizes that her unconventional family which isn’t what she reads about in books, should be in one. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

9. Deep in the Sahara by Kelly Cunnane, illustrated by Hoda Hadadi

The people in Mauritania, West Africa are Muslim and the women wear a malafa. Lalla wants a malafa too but but it’s not for beauty, or to be mysterious, or to look like others, or to be like royalty. When Lalla hears the evening call to prayer, she realizes the malafa is so that she can pray like the others. And then she gets a malafa of her own to go to the mosque with her mother. A malafa is for faith! [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Read more…

Diverse Children's Books

Featuring a Character with a Disability

Our theme for today’s Diverse Children’s Books linkup is Diverse Book(s) Featuring a Character with a Disability. (Need ideas? Check out past winners of the Schneider Family Book Awards.) (The theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?


Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

Read more…