All posts in Multicultural Books for Kids

Diverse Children's Books

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Our theme for today’s Diverse Children’s Books linkup is Favorite International Book(s) for Children. Share your favorite book or books that take place in a different country than where you live! (The theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.) This is my pick:

Magic Trash: A Story of Tyree Guyton and His Art by J. H. Shapiro, illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton

MAGIC TRASH: A Story of Tyree Guyton and His Art. He literally turned trash into art to save his decaying Detroit neighborhood. And it worked. The Heidelberg Project is more than 30 years old.

Visit this remarkable public art display in Detroit or online at www.heidelberg.org.

 

What Is #DiverseKidLit?


Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

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10 Great Books on China for Kids

10 Great Books on China for Kids

We’re creating a Multicultural Children’s Book Day eBook of diversity book resources. Twenty-two bloggers and authors are contributing their best diversity lists to help educators and parents find the books they need: All Done Monkey, Books My Kids Read, Crafty Moms Share, Colours of UsThe Educators’ Spin On It, Franticmommy, Growing Book by Book, Imagination Soup, InCulture ParentThe Jenny Evolution, Jump Into a Book, Kid World Citizen, Uma Krishnaswami, The LogonautsMama Smiles, Marie PasticheElsa Marston, The Measured Mom, PragmaticMomRandomly ReadingWhat Do We Do All Day?, and Youth Literature Reviews. Proceeds from this eBook coming out this fall will be used to donate books to teachers and parents.

At my kids’ elementary school, our second grade spends part of the year studying China. These are my favorite ten books to learn about China, both past and present. It’s a mix of nonfiction and fiction, and also different genres covering picture books, early chapter books, and a graphic novel.

What books am I missing? Thanks for your suggestions!

10 Great Books on China for Kids

10. Mei-Mei Loves the Morning by Margaret Tsubakiyama

Experience life in modern-day China with Mei-Mei, her grandfather, and her bird as they spend the morning on biking through the streets of an urban city in China. First stop is a chat with a cobbler on the street. Then, it’s off to the park for tai-chi. The lao-bing man’s stall for pancakes is their last stop before heading home. Filled with multigenerational warmth, Mei-Mei’s sh0ws kids that life in other countries has the same gentle rhythms of eating, exercising, and playing as their own. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

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Celebrating African American Hair Picture Books & GIVEAWAY

Celebrating African American Hair Picture Books & GIVEAWAY

You might recognize Furqan from our Multicultural Children’s Book Day poster! Robert Liu-Trujillo created the artwork for our event. When Rob gave us sketches for the poster, we didn’t know the boy in the flat top was a character in his book; he just appealed to us and we picked him right away!

FREE Downloadable Multicultural Children’s Book Day Poster!

I’m thrilled to be introducing Rob’s book, Furqan’s First Flat Top, today and we are giving away an inscribed copy too (see below)!

 Furqan's First Flat Top

Valarie and I are passionate about the need for more multicultural, diverse, and inclusive books for kids. Today, I wanted to examine this from the perspective of When Whiteness is The Standard of Beauty. Lisa Wade, professor at Occidental College, notes:

One manifestation of white supremacy is the use of whiteness as the standard of beauty. When whiteness is considered superior, white people are considered more attractive by definition and, insofar as the appearance of people of other races deviates from that standard, they are considered ugly.

Non-white people are still allowed to be considered beautiful, of course, as long as they look like white people.

This is a no win standard for women of color, but then think about how this affects girls of color and their self esteem? Read more…

Multicultural Children's Book Bundle Giveaway

Multicultural Children’s Book Giveaway!

It’s time for the 2nd Annual Multicultural Children’s Book Giveaway and KidLit TV is teaming up with Pragmatic MomJump into a BookFranticmommyThe Educators Spin On ItWhat We Do All Day and Multicultural Children’s Book Day to give parents, teachers, and librarians in need, a chance to win a multicultural book bundle for their school library.

Libraries play an important role in everyone’s life. The library is a place where knowledge and the love of reading shine!  However, budgets for school programs are being cut, and school libraries have been heavily affected. Hours for library time have been shortened in some schools, and even non-existent in others.

Up until September 30th you can enter to win a curated bundle of multicultural books featuring StoryMakers guests and additional kid lit authors.

Multicultural Children's Book Bundle Giveaway

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10 Great Picture Books to Learn About Mexico

10 Great Picture Books to Learn About Mexico

My kids studied Mexico in 2nd grade, a unit that was filled with crafts and excitement, including a Mexico Day Party. One of the student’s mother who teaches Spanish at the high school, even participated by dressing up as Frida Kahlo to teach the kids Spanish. At the end of fifth grade, some kids still talked about Mexico Day. Apparently making guacamole was a highlight of their elementary school experience!

Mexico 2nd grade unit

This collection of picture books is meant for all years of elementary school. I noticed that our 5th graders studied the Ancient Mayans.

10 Great Picture Books to Learn About Mexico

10.  Rain Player by David Wisniewski

This reads like a folk tale but it’s actually an original story set in Maya civilization. A drought been foretold. Chac, the god of rain, is displeased when a boy, Pik, speaks disrespectfully. To earn the god’s favor, Pik must win pok-a-tok, sending a five-pound ball of rubber through stone hoops on a walled court. If Pik is defeated, he and his teammates will be turned into frogs. Pik appeals to the Jaguar, the Quetzal, and the sacred cenote, who are persuaded to join his team. Will Pik be able to make the rains fall? [picture book, ages 6 and up]

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Diverse Children's Books

Join Us for #diversekidlit

Looking for #DiverseKidLit?

I’ve been making very, very short videos of picture books like this one, Mama the Alien by Rene Colato Lainez.

The confusion of being a legal alien versus an alien from outer space makes its bilingual Spanish picture book the perfect conversation starter about the naturalization process.

Mama the Alien by Rene Colato Lainez, illustrated by Laura Lacamara

♫ Background song, Englishman In New York, by Sting.

Here’s more…

Get #diversekidlit Recommendations on Pinterest!

We’ve started a new group board on Pinterest to highlight all the amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!

Diverse Children’s Books linkup is Diverse Books for Back to School. Please consider writing and sharing your favorite books either about school / back to school or that might make a great read aloud during those first few weeks of school. (The theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are still always welcome.)

What’s Is #diversekidlit?


Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit
Civil Rights Movement Book Giveaways! #BlackLivesMatter

Civil Rights Movement Book Giveaways! #BlackLivesMatter

I’ve been seeing tweets about the Tuskegee Airmen that have been passing away. NPR has an article on Roscoe Brown: Remembering Tuskegee Airman Roscoe Brown, Educator And Civil Rights Trailblazer. He recently passed away in July at age 94.

Remembering Tuskegee Airman Roscoe Brown, Educator And Civil Rights Trailblazer

I wouldn’t have noticed the tweets, had I not been fortunate to read Carole Boston Weatherford’s excellent novel in verse You Can Fly, about the role the Tuskegee Airmen played in the Civil Rights Movement. I consider them the Jackie Robinson(s) of aviation.

I wouldn’t have read You Can Fly, had I not been fortunate to meet Carole at a book event for Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer; The Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement.

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15 Wonderful Chinese New Year Picture Books

15 Wonderful Chinese New Year Picture Books

Chinese New Year may be what most of us think of when we think of Asian New Year celebrations marked by dumplings, lion dances, new clothes, and feasts. I’ve included other Asian Lunar New Year picture books as well for those who want to explore further.

My list includes:

  • Picture Books About Families Celebrating Chinese (and Lunar) New Year
  • Picture Books About Chinese and Lunar New Year
  • Retold Fairy Tales with a Chinese New Year Twist
  • Chinese New Year Craft and Activity Books

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Top 10: Best Native American Books for Kids

Top 10: Best Native American Books for Kids (newly improved!)

I, along with Jump Into a Book, Franticmommy, am working on a Multicultural Children’s Book Day eBook of diversity, multicultural, and inclusive books lists from bloggers and authors including: All Done Monkey, Books My Kids Read, Crafty Moms Share, Colours of Us, The Educators’ Spin On It, Growing Book by Book, Imagination Soup, InCulture Parent, The Jenny Evolution, Kid World Citizen, The Logonauts, Mama SmilesMarie Pastiche, The Measured Mom, Randomly Reading, What Do We Do All Day?,Youth Literature Reviews, author Elsa Marson, and author Uma Krishnaswami.

I’ll be contributing a few book lists to contribute and I’m updating them to reflect nuances that I’ve learned through my journey of blogging. In the case of Native American books for children, I wanted to emphasize contemporary stories as some kids including my own, think that American Indians are a relic from the past.

 

10. Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie, illustrated by Yuyi Morales

Sherman Alexie’s first picture book reflects on his Spokane Native American tradition of getting a new name to mark the transition to adulthood. There are 500 federally recognized tribal nations in the United States, each with its own diversity of language, ceremonies, and naming. To respect the deeper meaning of the naming, classroom activities where kids pick their own Indian names are not recommended as it is not culturally sensitive. This is a delightful and funny picture book sure to engage kids. The vibrant illustrations by Caldecott illustrator Yuyi Morales perfectly match the story. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

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