All posts in Asian American Children’s Books

14 Asian American Picture Books About Food

14 Asian American Picture Books About Food

Being Asian means that you are all about food. Did you know that the greeting in Chinese, 你吃了吗? {Ni (third tone) Chi (first tone) Le (first tone) Ma(third tone), means have you eaten yet?! The family style serving platters set the tone; meals are meant to be eaten together!

dim sum

It’s no surprise that there are quite a few Asian American children’s books centered around food. But you’ll notice that there are two themes to these books; proud to eat Asian food and embarrassed by it.

Chinese bakery

I hope this list will help kids realize that their native foods should be celebrated! What are your favorite Asian American picture books centered around food? Read more…

World Book Night book list for kids and teens

World Book Night Books for Kids and Teens

Today is World Book Night and the purpose is to spread the love of reading from person to person.

World Book Night

World Book Night has assembled a book list for 2014 and I’ve hightlighted the books for kids and teens.

World Book Night

I hope you get a chance to spread the love of reading tonight by reading together or gifting a book!

Read more…

Asian American Books for kids

My Favorite Asian American Books for Kids

I’m so sorry to be late for the Homeschool Blogging Carninal hosted by hosted by Lisa at The Squishable Baby and Keisha at Unschooling MommaI’ve been distracted by racism in a musical at my local high school that has hit a nerve and generated a lot of press including a front page article in The Boston Globe, 2 OpEd articles in The Boston Globe, an article across the pond at The Daily Telegraph and a slew of blog posts both by me and other bloggers. If you want to read them, they are all here.

This makes me realize that multicultural books for kids are, perhaps, the first step for breaking racist stereotypes and introducing diversity in a positive way into the lives of our children. Today, I wanted to share a few of my favorite Asian American children’s books. I hope you enjoy them with your children.

I chose a picture book, easy reader, easy chapter book, chapter book and a young adult novel that portray contemporary Asian Americans.  That’s 5 books. 5 is a lucky number in Chinese culture. 4 is bad because it signifies death. Read more…

APALA best asian american books for kids 2013

2014 Asian American Children’s Book Awards & Kid Lit Blog Hop

Have you heard of the APALA children’s book awards? Of course not. I blogged for three years on children’s books seeking out the best Asian American KidLit and I didn’t know about it. That’s a shame because Asian American children’s books are slowly coming into their own, well on the heels perhaps of the Asian American novel trend started by Amy Tan. Still, I am thrilled to see this genre flourishing.

The first point of confusion:

APALA = Asian Pacific American Librarians Association

The second point of confusion:

The APALA Literature Awards are called the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature. Read more…

Kid Lit Blog Hop & Highlighting Multicultural Children's Books

Highlighting Multicultural Children’s Books & Kid Lit Blog Hop

Last Monday was a busy day. Valarie from Jump Into a Book and I co-hosted Multicultural Children’s Book Day along with more than 80 wonderful bloggers:

2GirlsLostInaBook · 365 Days of Motherhood · A Bilingual Baby · A Library Mama · A Simple Life, Really? · Africa to America · After School for Smarty Pants · All Done Monkey · Andi’s Kids Books · Anita Brown Bag  · Austin Gilkeson · Barbara Ann Mojica ·  Between The Covers ·  Bookish Ambition · Books My Kids Read · Bottom Shelf Books · Cats Eat Dogs ·Chasing The Donkey · Children’s Book-a-Day Almanac · Children’s Books Heal · Church o Books · CitizenBeta · Crafty Moms Share · Discovering The World Through My Son’s Eyes· Early Words · Flowering Minds · Franticmommy · Gathering Books · Geek Club Books · GEO Librarian · GIFT Family Services · Gladys Barbieri · Going in Circles · Growing Barefoot Bookworms · Growing Book by Book · iGame Mom · I’m Not The Nanny · InCulture Parent · Itsy Bitsy Mom · Just Children’s Books · Kid Lit Reviews · Kids Yoga Stories · Kid World Citizen · Kristi’s Book Nook · Mama Lady Books · Mama Smiles · Mission Read ·Monkey Poop · Mother Daughter Book Reviews · Mrs AOk · MrsTeeLoveLifeLaughter · Ms. Yingling Reads · Multicultural Kids Blog · My White Board · One Sweet World · Open Wide The World · P is for Preschooler · Rapenzel Dreams · Randomly Reading · Reading Through Life · School4Boys · Sharon the Librarian · Spanish Playground · Sprout’s Bookshelf · Squishable Baby · Stanley and Katrina · Svetlana’s Reads and Views · Teach Mama · The Art of Home Education · The Brain Lair · The Educators’ Spin On It · The Family-Ship Experience · The Good Long Road · The Yellow Door Paperie · This Kid Reviews Books · Trishap’s Books · Unconventional Librarian · Vicki Arnold · We3Three· World for Learning · Wrapped in Foil

Thank you also to our sponsors: Wisdom Tales Press, Susan Daniel Fayad, Lee and Low Books, and Chronicle Books.

Pinterest-collage1-210x300

We had 144 (and counting!) posts linked up and I thought I’d share a few of the books with you today.

From Story Snug: Anna Hibiscus picture book series by Atinuke Read more…

Chinese New Year crafts and books for kids

Chinese New Year Crafts and Books for Kids: The Year of the Horse

The Chinese year 4712 begins on Jan. 31, 2014. It’s the Year of the Horse which is PickyKidPix‘s year and also those born during February 03, 1954 to January 23, 1955; January 21, 1966 to February 08, 1967; February 07, 1978 to January 27, 1979; January 27, 1990 to February 14, 1991; February 12, 2002 to January 31, 2003; and January 31, 2014 to February 18, 2015.

 

The Year of the Horse Personality

Those born under the sign of the Horse are a flexible group of people. They tend to be stubborn when it comes their ideas, but they are also incredibly patient when it comes to hearing out what other people have to say. They favor straight forward, occasionally blunt conversation. And yet they generally avoid starting up any unnecessary trouble. This combination then makes those under the Horse sign a bit of a puzzle to the people around them. Though this certainly does not stop people from trying to figure them out. from Senn Read more…

Multicultural Children's Book Day, Jump Into a Book

Join Us for Multicultural Children’s Book Day January 27!

 Multicultural Children’s Book Day

January 27, 2014

Our mission is to not only raise awareness for the kid’s books that celebrate diversity, but to get more of these of books into classrooms and libraries.

 Children’s reading and play advocates Valarie Budayr from Jump Into a Book and Mia Wenjen from Pragmatic Mom have teamed up to create an ambitious (and much needed) national event.  On January 27th, Jump into a Book and Pragmatic Mom will be presenting the first ever Multicultural Children’s Book Day as a way of celebrating diversity in children’s books.

Read more…

Remembering the Veterans in My Life

Remembering the Veterans in My Life on Veterans Day

At first I thought that we didn’t have any veterans in our family but then at lunch today with my son, his friend and my husband, we all thought about it.

There’s my uncle Arthur Takahashi who served in the 442nd Infantry Regiment during WWII. As a Japanese American, he enlisted despite his family — including my mother —  being forced to relocate from their home and losing most of their possessions as a result.

The 442nd Regimental Combat Team of the United States Army was a regimental size fighting unit composed almost entirely of American soldiers of Japanese descent who fought in World War II, despite the fact many of their families were subject to internment. The 442nd, beginning in 1944, fought primarily in Europe during World War II. The 442nd was a self-sufficient force, and fought with uncommon distinction in Italy, southern France, and Germany.

The 442nd is considered to be the most decorated infantry regiment in the history of the United States Army. The 442nd was awarded eight Presidential Unit Citations and twenty-one of its members were awarded the Medal of Honor for World War II. The 442nd’s high distinction in the war and its record-setting decoration count earned it the nickname “Purple Heart Battalion.”

The 442nd Regimental Combat Team motto was, “Go for Broke“.

442nd go for broke Japanese American

image from Battle Story

442nd japanese americans wwii

image from CaliSphere

Photographer: Mace, Charles E. — Camp Shelby, Mississippi.

I chose Baseball Saved Us by Ken Mochizuki in his honor. While my mother did not end up in an Internment Camp because she had relatives in a remote part of Utah, most of her neighbors in San Francisco’s Japantown did. Baseball Saved Us tells the story of a Japanese American boy and his family who build a baseball diamond in their internment camp.

Read more…

Asian American books for kids, kite flying books, kite fighting books for kids, 3rd grade books, 4th grade books, 5th grade books

Let’s Go Fly a Kite!

Kite Flying in Kids’ Books

The Blossom Kite Festival is an annual event that is traditionally a part of the festivities at the National Cherry Blossom Festival on the National Mall in Washington, DC.

The Cherry Blossom Kite Festival in Washington, DC, includes the rokkaku kite battle mentioned in Flying the Dragon, modern kite-making, and the children’s best handmade kite contest.

For anyone lucky to be in Washington D.C. at the end of March, here are the details:

Date and Time
March 30, 2013
10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Location
On the grounds of the Washington Monument, Constitution Avenue & 17th Streets, NW Washington, DC.

For those of us who can’t be there, we can recreate this experience!

Kite flying dates back to Ancient China, but in Japan, there is a special day called Children’s Day (a.k.a. Boy’s Day) dedicated to flying kites including these Koi windsacks.

Japanese Koi Kites

Children’s Day (Kodomo no hi) is celebrated on 5th May in Japan. It is a national holiday honoring moms and kids, historically boys. Until recently, 5th May used to be known as Boy’s Day (Tango no Sekku, or the Feast of Banners). In Japanese culture, the carp (or koi) represents courage and perseverance, as the fish is known for its strength and determination as it swims against the current upstream. Read more…