All posts in Best Books for Kids

90 Second Newbery Film Festival Competition

Enter 90-Second Newbery Film Festival

The deadline for 90-Second Newbery Film Festival entries is January 7, 2017 (special deadlines for San Antonio, TX (12/2/2016) and Asheville, NC (2/8/2017)).

The 90-Second Newbery Film Festival—an annual celebration of kids’ creativity in which young filmmakers create short movies telling the entire stories of Newbery Medal and Newbery Honor books in roughly 90 seconds—is now open for submissions for its sixth year. Read more…

Diverse Children's Books

Favorite Holiday Books #DiverseKidLit Linky

 Our theme for this month’s Favorite Holiday Books. (Please feel free to share any holiday resources, not just winter holidays.) The theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.

Chinese New Year is January 28th, 2017 but the Japanese and Koreans celebrate New Year on January 1st. It’s a little confusing for my kids given that they are half Korean, and one quarter Chinese and Japanese American.

I wanted to share a new Chinese New Book that I just added to my Chinese New Year book list. It’s an update to my Top 10: Chinese New Year Books. This list will also be in a new eBook for Multicultural Children’s Book Day that we are publishing as a fundraiser.

The Nian Monster by Andrea Wang, illustrated by Alina Chau

The ancient legend of the Nian monster gives background to why Chinese New Year is celebrated with the color red, loud noises and fire. XingLing knows about the Nian Monster but is shocked to see it appear in Shanghai, ready to devour her and her city. She uses her wits to outsmart the Nian monster. The special foods used to celebrate Chinese New Year also have a role to play in defeating the Nian monster. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit
Win Fantastic Beasts Books for Kids: 4 WINNERS!

Win Fantastic Beasts Books for Kids: 4 WINNERS!

My oldest, Grasshopper and Sensei, is a huge Harry Potter fan. She waited in line to see Fantastic Beasts opening day and raved about it. Because of her, we own many Harry Potter wands. Our Harry Potter books are dog eared; some books even needed to be replaced.

And so, it’s for her, that I jumped at the chance to give away these wonderful Harry Potter gift books, timed so that the winners can gift them for the holidays if they chose unselfishly not to keep them for themselves.

Please fill out the Rafflecopter below to win! Read more…

10 Amazing Graphic Novels for Kids & Signed Big Nate GIVEAWAY

10 Amazing Graphic Novels for Kids & Signed Big Nate GIVEAWAY

Please welcome my guest blogger today, none other than the author/illustrator of the insanely popular Big Nate series, Lincoln Peirce. My son, now 12 year olds, is a huge fan and we credit Lincoln Peirce with getting my son to love reading. We are wowed by Epic Big Nate, an expansive, slipcased collector’s edition that includes:

  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid author Jeff Kinney’s exclusive interview with creator Lincoln Peirce
  • an insider’s view into the world of cartooning
  • Peirce’s favorite strips of all time along with his exclusive commentary
  • a ton of cartoons presented chronologically

With more than 14 million books sold, Big Nate is a BIG deal. Kids 8 – 12, as well older kids with nostalgia for the beloved strip, will go nuts for this book, making it an EPIC gift idea. My son would wholeheartedly agree!

I’m giving away a SIGNED copy of Epic Big Nate to one lucky winner. Please fill out Rafflecopter at the bottom to enter.

Read more…

Japanese Internment Books for Kids & My Family's Story

Japanese Internment Books for Kids & My Family’s Story

During WWII, more than 110,000 Japanese Americans were forced from their homes after President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 in February 1942 in response to prejudiced fears that Japanese Americans were spies.

I’m probably one of a few children’s book blogger whose family was forced into internment camps during WWII for being Japanese American. Let me tell you my family’s story:

Japanese Internment Books for Kids & My Family's Story

My mother was born in San Francisco’s Japantown. After school every day, she would go, on roller skates, from her high school to Japanese school to study the language and arts like ikebana, Japanese flower arrangement, stopping on the way in a Japanese convenience store for a snack like senbei, Japanese rice crackers.

She, like all Japanese Americans (and the Chinese who immigrated before them in large numbers), were subject to racism which included special laws meant to limit their economic success. For example, Japanese Americans like herself, were not allowed to work for the government as civil servants. Even if she aced the government civil service exam, she would never be hired. Japanese immigrants were, by law, not allowed to own property in the United States, even if they could afford to buy a home for themselves and their family. The Asian Exclusion Act, part of the Immigration Act of 1924, completely excluded immigrants from Asia.

The Immigration Act of 1924 limited the number of immigrants allowed entry into the United States through a national origins quota. The quota provided immigration visas to two percent of the total number of people of each nationality in the United States as of the 1890 national census. It completely excluded immigrants from Asia. from Historian

When soldiers showed up on her doorstep, giving her family just two days to pack up one suitcase each, leaving all their belongings behind; this didn’t happen overnight. A whole series of events happened leading up to this first.

Slap That Jap and Dr. Seuss racist cartoons

Dr. Seuss was a racist. Read more…

Our CoHosts for Multicultural Children's Book Day 2017!

Our CoHosts for Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2017!

As with any event, success is measured by the strength and effectiveness of the team. MCBD’s CoHosts are an example of just that.

The Multicultural Children’s Book Day CoHosts are a group of powerhouse bloggers and parents who all share the same passion for reading and understand the importance of diversity in children’s literature. They also act as ambassadors for MCBD’s yearly event by assisting in spreading the word, extending the event’s reach through social media and acting as hosts sites for the wildly popular book review/blog post link-up that occurs on the actual day of the holiday (1/27/17).

We are proud to introduce our sixteen CoHosts for our 2017 event below. These writers, moms, reviewers, book lovers and thought leaders were selected by the MCBD team because of their true dedication to supporting diversity in children’s literature and we would appreciate if you could take a few minutes and visit each of these excellent blogs and say “hello.”

cohost

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National Geographic Kids 3 Book GIVEAWAY!

National Geographic Kids 3 Book GIVEAWAY!

I’m thrilled to be giving away three great nonfiction books from National Geographic Kids! My son loves the Weird But True! series, the Almanacs, and weird facts about the natural world, in general.

These are books to flip around in, to marvel at the wondrous creatures in our world, and to go back to again and again. They get reluctant readers reading and both girls and boys equally are drawn to these books. They make great holiday gifts for kids, ages 8-12!

National Geographic Kids 3 Book GIVEAWAY

Happy Holidays from National Geographic Kids!
One (1) winner receives copies of:

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Diverse Children's Books

Diverse Children’s Book Linky: LGBTQ #DiverseKidLit & More

Our theme for this month’s Diverse Children’s Books linkups is Favorite Children’s Books Featuring an LGBTQ Character(s). (The theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

Read more…

Books For Kids About Cambodia (ages 4 to 16)

Books For Kids About Cambodia (ages 4 to 16)

I was working on book lists for Hmong, Lao, Vietnam, and Cambodia, but it turns out that there are few fiction books on their countries but quite a few on Cambodia. Like Japanese American books that mostly focus on WWII internment, many fiction books revolve on Khmer Rouge Cambodia, a heartbreaking event in history.

Still, there are other sides of the Cambodian story that emerge from this book list: folk tales that turn on the clever rabbit (the peasant who outwits those in power), the refugee immigrant, and the lives of Cambodians post war.

This list can also be used as part of a discussion on racism, and who is an “American.” I hope you enjoy these books as much as I did. You can also use this list as a companion to Holocaust books for kids.

If you have other books to add on Cambodia, Laos, the Hmong or Vietnam, I’d welcome them! Thanks for sharing!

 

Books for Kids About Cambodia

Who Belongs Here?: An American Story by Margy Burns Knight, illustrated by Anne Sibley O’Brien

A refugee’s story of who belongs here in America? After facing the most brutal of regimes, Nary, his grandfather and uncle are able to leave a refugee camp to relocate in America. Far from being the land of opportunity, they face racism. Similarly, Nary is bullied at school. Use this book to help students understand the refugee experience and to build bridges of understanding and compassion. Italicized notes on each page give a deeper view of the immigration experience. This book is also great paired with immigration picture books from other countries. [picture book, ages 8 and up]

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