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Skittles Rainbow Science Experiment Fail

Easy and Fun Rainbow Science Experiments

A rainbow is made of the colors red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet. Where did the rainbow come from? All the colors exist in sunlight. We can’t see them because they are mixed together.

When sunlight moves from the air to the water in the glass, it bends in a special way. When it bends, the light separates into all the colors of the rainbow. It’s called refraction. From How To Make a Rainbow video

We tried this on our own but with much poorer results.

Skittles Rainbow Science Experiment Fail

Our hypothesis: our plate was too large. Try again with smaller plate so the colors have less area to run together.

This is another fun rainbow experiment to try.

Rainbow Books for Kids

Planting a Rainbow by Lois Ehlert

The flowers in a garden represent the colors of the rainbow in this beautifully illustrated picture book. Can you find the hidden heart shape that Lois Ehlert hides in all her books? [picture book, ages 2 and up]

The Magic School Bus Makes A Rainbow: A Book About Color by Joanna Cole, illusgtrated by  Carolyn Braken and Bruce Degen

Ms. Frizzle and her class ride into a whitelight pinball machine to learn about color and light. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

 To examine any book more closely at Amazon, please click on image of book.

I am an Amazon affiliate which means if you buy anything through my blog, I get a very small kickback at no cost to you. I use this money to pay for postage and handling for my giveaways.


Hawaiian Folk Tales & Children's Books

Hawaiian Folk Tales & Children’s Books

When I was a child, a relative in Hawaii from my mother’s side that I’d never met sent me two picture books as a Christmas present. It was a little weird because they didn’t send a gift for either of two siblings, nor did they indicate that this was a shared gift.

Pua Pua Lena Lena and the Magic Kiha-Pu by Guy & Pam Buffet, illustrated by Guy Buffet

One book was a Hawaiian folk tale of Pua Pua Lena Lena, a kind of magical dog who has to  retrieve the kiha pu, a conch shell that sounds an alarm if an enemy is approaching the kingdom, from spirits who have stolen it. This is his punishment for accidentally stealing plants from the Royal Garden in order to make awa tea for his master.

I also received a beautiful version of Momotaro, the peach boy warrior, a Japanese folk tale.

Both books were treasured favorites of mine, and I still have both copies. Since then, I’ve been fortunate to visit Hawaii a few times. My husband played golf for the University of Hawaii which is another connection that brings us back there.

I’m working on a series of Folk Tale posts from Asia and the Pacific Islands. Korea was my first. Today’s post celebrates Folk Tales from Hawaii. Because I had trouble finding these stories, I’ve also included Hawaiian notable picture book biographies.

p.s. I also have a post on Pearl Harbor Books for Kids.

p.p.s. This is the second post of my Folk Tale series. The first one is 16 Great Korean Folk Tales for Kids. Read more…

Visiting West Coast Art Schools

Visiting West Coast Art Schools & Foodie Stops Nearby

We are planning our family summer vacation trip around art and design school visits for my oldest, Grasshopper and Sensei, who is a rising senior in high school. Her wish list for this trip includes a visit to the Chihuly Gardens in Seattle so we will be driving from San Francisco to Vancouver, British Columbia, with a pit stop along the way in Seattle. For anyone planning a similar trip, note that rental car places will not let you return the car in another country, including Canada. Thus, we have to fly out of Seattle in order to drop the car off.

We are also doing a quick leg in Southern California to see a few schools, and my mother as well. At 92, she’s now in an independent living home, so we plan to see her and take her out for a meals. Foodie stops are important for all legs of the trip, and I’m including my research on those in this post below. My mother likes Asian food that is both delicious, plentiful, and inexpensive. We all joke that she must have a hollow leg because her appetite is impressive.

How about you? Any foodie stops you recommend for us to check out in Southbay California, San Francisco, Seattle and/or Vancouver, British Columbia? Thanks for sharing.

Art Schools Southern California

California Institute of the Arts: CalArts

California Institute of the Arts: CalArts

My daughter is interested in the very competitive computer animation program at CalArts. Read more…

31+ STEM Books to Inspire Girls

31+ STEM Books to Inspire Girls

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development on Tuesday, which found that 15-year-old girls around the world, outperform boys in science – except for in the United States, Britain and Canada. via The Guardian

Breaking down theNational Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) scores by gender, girls averaged 151 points (out of a possible 300), three points higher than for boys in the first-ever Technology and Engineering Literacy (TEL) assessment was given in 2014. via The Atlantic

So what is it? Girls are better than boys at science? Or girls are worse at science? Or girls in higher socio-economic brackets outperform boys?

What’s the end goal? Karen Peterson, the chief executive of the National Girls Collaborative Project, says  it’s to “increase their persistence and resilience in STEM studies so that those early kernels of interest translate into meaningful careers.”

As a mom of two girls, I am of the opinion that it’s the parents’ job to pay attention to where the child leads you. For my oldest, her path is towards art school. For my middle daughter, a STEM career mixed with an entrepreneur’s drive seems likely. And yet, the big thinkers at RISD think they very well will end up at the same place. For what is STEM without creativity?

If you peruse the timeline of female scientists and their picture book biographies, one thing is clear. If someone really wants a career in science, she’s not going to let anything stop her. Here’s to the progress women have made in science, and here’s to supporting all girls as they find their passion in life.

What are your favorite STEM books that inspire girls? Thanks for sharing!

STEM Picture Books for Girls

Rosie Revere, Engineer by Andrea Beaty

Life might have its failures, but this was not it.

The only true failure can come if you quit.

Rosie is an closet inventor after she thought her cheese hat python deterrent hat was ridiculed. She uses the hat with some tweaks into a flying contraption for her aunt and learns that failure is the problem solving tool of an engineer. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty, illustrated by David Roberts

Ada didn’t speak until she turned three, but when she did, she was full of questions, especially about why? Turns out, she has all the traits and the heart of a great scientist (though she’s also an exhausting kid to raise!). [picture book, ages 4 and up]

The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires

A little girl has an amazing idea that she’s going to make the most magnificent thing! All she has to do is make it. But making her magnificent thing leads down a frustrating path of trial and error. This book best reflects–Inspiration + motivation + passion = Endless possibilities. The girl’s emotional journey reminds a child not to quit. [picture book ages 3 and up]

Read more…

Dr. Seuss Museum Oh The Places They Don't Go

Dr. Seuss Museum Invite then Crickets

I wanted to share some of the correspondence that I’ve had with Dr. Seuss Museum’s Director of Public Relations and Marketing, Karen Fisk. It started after this AP article was published and I was included in the AP video.

Oh the Places You’ll Go! Dr. Seuss museum opens its doors Associated Press

“The first national museum dedicated to the beloved children’s author and illustrator Dr. Seuss has opened in his hometown of Springfield, Mass. But Theodore Geisel’s early controversial political illustrations are conspicuously absent.” (June 5)AP

Karen Fisk contacted me to invite me to visit.

 

May 25, 2017

Hi Mia,

I wanted to say hello and reach out to see if you would like to visit the Dr. Seuss Museum as my guest. Please let me know.

We have not yet completed the work we are doing to acknowledge and discuss the work Theodor Geisel did that you address in your most recent column, but we know it is important and complicated and needs to be discussed.  We intend to have programming and literature on the subject.

Hope to hear from you soon,

Karen

Karen Fisk

Director of Public Relations & Marketing

Springfield Museums & Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden Read more…

Diverse Children's Books

#DiverseKidLit Socioeconomic Diversity

Our theme for this #DiverseKidLit is socioeconomic diversity. Kids from all economic brackets should be able to find themselves in books – as well as to learn about the lives of others in different economic situations. (As always, the theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

Read more…

Baby & Boxing Announcements

Baby & Boxing Announcements

Thank you to Basic Invite for sponsoring this post. My opinions, as always, are my own.

My boxing trainer is not a man of many words and doesn’t tend to share details of his private life so it’s up to me and my mom friends who have been training with him for over five years to extract this information.

Mia Wenjen and Marc Gargaro at Nonantum Boxing Club

Typically, we train in small groups of two or three, occasionally ramping up to five. Once in a while, though, it’s just one lonesome person. That was me last week. On my own for a one hour private lesson. It’s a great learning opportunity, but I like and need the rest period that one or two other compatriots provide. Read more…

New Back to School Picture Books GIVEAWAY!

New Back to School Picture Books GIVEAWAY!

Is it time to get back into the swing of school? Hopefully, not just yet! We have a few more weeks of summer and I hope you do too. But, it’s IS a good time to talk about school starting to ease any anxieties. These five books do the trick.

How about you? What are your favorite back to school traditions or books? Thanks for sharing!

p.s. A few more Back to School book lists here:

Top 10 Diversity Starting School Books

Top 10 Starting School Picture Books

Books for Back to School Issues

 

New Back to School Picture Books GIVEAWAY!

A New School Year: Stories in Six Voices by Sally Derby, illustrated by Mika Song

Six kids in grades kindergarten through fifth grade start school with anxieties and fears. Ethan, a kindergartener, hides something in his pocket for comfort. Zach in first grade worries about learning everything over again. Katie frets that her new teacher in second grade isn’t her old teacher in first grade. Jackie isn’t the only third grader to get dropped off early. Fourth grader Carlos wonders if he will make new friends. Fifth grade Mia has hearing aids that almost make her late. As each child navigates the first day of school, their free verse poems show how everything turns out fine. [free verse poetry picture book, ages 5 and up]

Read more…

Filipino-American Children's Books & GIVEAWAY

Filipino-American Children’s Books & GIVEAWAY

Mika Song and Isabel Roxas have teamed up to come up with Filipino and Filipino-American Children’s books which are few and far between. I only know Cora Makes Pancit by  Dorina K. Lazo Gilmore, illustrated by Kristi Valiant.

Mika has a new book out from Charlesbridge Publishing and we are giving away a copy! We are also giving away two bilingual picture books illustrated by Isabel Roxas: Mang Andoy’s Signs and Araw Sa Palengke. Please fill out the Rafflecopter at the bottom to enter. There will be three winners, one for each book.

A New School Year: Six Stories in Six Voices by Sally Derby, illustrated by Mika Song

Meet six diverse kids from grades Kindergarten through fifth grade who are entering a new school year. They are both nervous and excited at what the first day will bring. Mika Song captures their hopes, dreams and fears with simple and engaging illustrations. [picture book, ages 5 and up]

Mang Andoy’s Signs by Mailin Paterno, illustrated by Isabel Roxas

A Philippine Children’s Book with dual language:Filipino and English. The art of persuasion is delightfully revealed in Mailin Paterno’s richly nuanced urban tale, illustrated with charm and zest of Isabel Roxas. Children will be all wiser to learn how you ask is just important as what you ask for. [bilingual Tagalog/English picture book, ages 4 and up]

Araw Sa Palengke by May Tobias-Papa, illustrated by  Isabel Roxas

I’m coming with Nanay! We’re going to the market. What would we see there? Who would I meet? Come, join us! Today is market day! Sasama ako kay Nanay! [bilingual Tagalog/English picture book, ages 4 and up]

How about you? Can you help us add to this list? Thanks!

 

Filipino and Filipino-American Children’s Books

Bahay Kubo illustrated by  Pergylene Acuña

This was one of my daughter’s favorite board books- she loved the silly vegetable characters and it’s a fun folk song to belt out. – Mika Song

[board book in Tagalog, ages 6 months and up]

Mang Andoy’s Signs by Mailin Paterno Illustrations by Isabel Roxas

A neat picture book full of charming Manila street scenes (hand-painted signs, street food and modes of transportation) that capture the ingenuity and nature of the people. – Mika Song

[bilingual English and Tagalog picture book, ages 3 and up]

Read more…