Understanding Transgender with LGBTQ Books for Kids

Understanding Transgender with LGBTQ Books for Kids

In searching for LGBTQ books for kids and teens, I realized how many different permutations a child might encounter and tried to find books for all different kids of LGTBQ families. Personally, I found the concept of Gender Fluidity to be the most confusing, so I’ve included Rick Riordan’s Magnus Chase series that does a terrific job of depicting this.

How about you? What LBGTQ books are your favorites? What LGBTQ books are missing from this list or need to be published? Thanks for sharing!

Understanding Transgender with LGBTQ Books for Kids

Picture Books with LGBTQ Parents

The Family Book by Todd Parr

Todd Parr’s inimitable voice assures readers that whether your family has two dads, two moms, or something else, every family is special in its own unique way. [picture book, ages 2 and up]

Stella Brings the Family by Miriam B. Schiffer, illustrated by Holly Clifton-Brown

This gentle story of Stella’s dilemma for her school Mother’s Day event showcases her loving family with two dads. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Heather Has Two Mommies by Lesléa Newman, illustrated by Laura Cornell

Heather has a lot of things in that come in pairs: arms, legs, pets … and moms! She has Mama Jane and Mama Kate. When she starts kindergarten, she realizes that she might be the only one without a daddy. But when her class draws a picture of their family, Heather realizes that every family is special and that it doesn’t matter how many mommies or daddies your family has. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson (Author), Peter Parnell (Author), illustrated by Henry Cole

A true story from New York’s Central Park Zoo that illustrates that it only takes love, even in the animal kingdom, to make a family. The penguin house is home to two daddy penguins who adopt an egg and hatch a baby.  [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Mommy, Mama, and Me by Lesléa Newman, illustrated by Carol Thompson

With rhyming text, this picture book depicts a loving lesbian couple with their toddler. [picture book, ages 3 and up]

ABC A Family Alphabet Book by Bobbie Combs, illustrated by Desiree & Brian Rappa

This alphabet books celebrates LBGTQ diversity in families but the point of this book is teaching the alphabet. I like how diversity is presented as every day. [picture book, ages 2 and up]

This Day in June by Gayle E. Pitman, illustrated by Kristyna Litten

Join in this celebration of the LGBT community and use this award-winning picture book as a tool for teaching understanding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people and families. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Bilingual Spanish LGBTQ Picture Books

One of a Kind, Like Me/Único Como Yo by Laurin Mayeno, illustrated by Robert Liu-Trujillo, translated by Teresa Mlawer

This is a gentle story introducing gender diversity. Danny wants to be a purple princess for the school parade, and his family helps him create a costume from thrift store finds. The author hopes that her book gives children a sense of belonging, courage to be who they are, and an appreciation for people who are different from themselves. [bilingual Spanish picture book, ages 4 and up]

My Dad is a Clown/Mi Papa Es Un Payaso by José Carlos Andrés and Natalia Hernandez Josa Carlos Andras

This charming bilingual Spanish picture book starts off with a boy who is called a clown in anger. He doesn’t mind. His dad is a clown and he know what important work it is. His other dad is a doctor; together they sneak into clown rehearsal and realize how grueling it is. As the boy ponders his loving fathers and the work they each do, he comes up with a plan to combine both for his future profession. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

 

Understanding Transgender Books for Kids and Teens

Red: A Crayon’s Story by Michael Hall

The struggle of a red crayon who doesn’t act like a red crayon is the perfect analogy for transkids. Even with the support of the entire art supply cabinet, red crayon is still blue. It’s not until berry crayon asks red crayon to draw an ocean that red crayon discovers his true self. His community accepts and praises who he truly is inside which makes for a very happy ending. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

I Am Jazz by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings, illustrated by Shelagh McNicholas

Even today, there are kids who tease me, or me by a boy name or ignore me altogether. This makes me feel crummy.

Then I remember that the kids who get to know me usually want to be my friend. They say I’m one of the nicest girls at school.

This gentle story gives a simple and thorough explanation of a little boy who identifies as a girl and the loving acceptance of this transition. This picture book is based on the real life experience of Jazz Jennings, a spokesperson for transkids. The straightforward honesty makes this the perfect book for kids to understand what it means to be transgender. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Introducing Teddy: A Gentle Story About Gender and Friendship by Jessica Walton, illustrated by Dougal MacPherson

A friendship between a little boy and his teddy bear isn’t affected when the teddy bear confesses that he’s feels in his heart that he’s a girl teddy, not a boy teddy, and wants to be called by Tilly instead of Teddy. Their friend Ava is accepting of this change too. This book is perfect for the youngest of readers to learn and discuss gender identity. [picture book, ages 3 and up]

George by Alex Gino

A coming out story of a boy who identifies as a girl. He really wants to play the role of Charlotte in the school’s play Charlotte’s Web and hopes by doing so, his family will realize and accept that he’s really a girl inside a boy body. [chapter book, ages 8 and up]

Lily and Dunkin by Donna Gephart

Lily, a transgender girl, and Dunkin, a boy dealing with bipolar disorder. Their powerful story will shred your heart, then stitch it back together with kindness, humor, bravery, and love.

Children’s book author, Tracy Byran, alerted me on Twitter: @tracybryan19 Lily and Dunkin is a MUST READ for every tween, teen, and adult everywhere! [chapter book, ages 1o and up]

Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out by Susan Kuklin

Six transgender kids talk candidly about their experience with their transition from childhood through the present time. Each has a unique story to tell. Some are heartbreaking as they also grappled with special needs, foster homes, and unsupportive parents. A few had a surprisingly easy time transitioning to their new gender, and use their positive experience to inspire others. Each story shares a new layer of understanding of being transgender for those of us still learning. Transgender can be straight or gay, something that always confused me. Male privilege reveals itself to those who went from girl to boy. Body dysmorphia is a separate issue. Bystanders can make a huge difference for trans kids between acceptance and bullying. For this reason alone, everyone tween should read this book. [young adult, ages 12 and up]

The Other Boy by M. G. Hennessey

THE OTHER BOY is the fictional story of a 12-year-old transgender boy living in stealth, and his journey to acceptance. It shows the different ways people react to a transgender child—fathers, mothers, doctors, teachers, friends, bullies—and also walks the reader through what it feels like to be trans. [chapter book, ages 9 and up]

Understanding Gender Fluidity Chapter Book

Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard: The Hammer of Thor by Rick Riordan

Riordan introduces a gender fluid newcomer to Valhalla, Alex Fierro. Sometimes identifying as a girl, and sometimes as a boy, somehow Magnus is able to discern her gender fluidity. That her father is Loki, a shapeshifter that also has assumed both male and female identities in many forms including animals, this character really helps the reader to understand what is means to be gender fluid. [chapter book, ages 9 and up]

LGBTQ Transition of Parent with Divorce

Love is What Makes Us a Family by Julia E. Morrison and Laura Knauer

This self published picture book has drawings that seem like a child drew them. It has an important story that isn’t represented in other picture books. In this book, the parents — dad and mom — get divorced, but both end up getting a new girlfriend. This is a great book for anyone experiencing this family transition as well as for others just to learn about the diversity of families. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

 To examine any book more closely at Amazon, please click on image of book.

Understanding Transgender with LGBTQ Books for Kids

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By Mia Wenjen, PragmaticMom

2 Comments

  1. Thanks, Mia!! I absolutely loved George! I’ll look for some of these other titles. I also love Worm Loves Worm :).

  2. I need to write down the entire list of titles. Have only read two of them.
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