Picture Book of the Day for Kids Living in Alcoholic Home

Living in an Alcoholic Home Picture Book of the Day

Today’s Picture Book of the Day comes from the Multicultural Children’s Book Day Twitter Party. We asked participants to tell us what inclusive, diversity and/or multicultural children’s books they having trouble finding. It’s a heartbreaking topic but kids who live in an alcoholic home was one such request. I researched and found these books at my local public library. Some of these books are still in print. I hope these books find their way into the hands of the kids who need this.

It’s interesting that there are so few books for kids about living in an alcoholic home as alcohol use disorders affect 16% of adults in the U.S., and more than 10 percent of U.S. children live with a parent with alcohol problems, according to a 2012 study. I would imagine kids who live in an alcoholic home feel very alone with this kind of problem and would benefit for books that show them that there are others facing this problem and give them ideas to help them cope.

I think the most important thing for kids who live in an alcoholic home to realize is that they are not the cause of their parent’s problem and that their parent has a disease which is no one’s fault.

Am I missing any books you recommend? Please share! Thank you!

Picture Book of the Day for Kids Living in Alcoholic Home

When Someone in the Family Drinks Too Much by Richard C. Langsen, illustrated by Nicole Rubel

The book starts off by defining what an alcoholic is, then continues with signs that someone may be an alcoholic including denial, mood swings, blackouts, and embarrassing behavior. I found the section of how a family is hurt by alcoholism to be helpful naming the different roles family members might assume: enabler, perfect child, rebel, lonely child and clown. Finally, the book concludes with advice on things you can do to feel better including ideas of where you can get help as a child. With a sensitive take on a difficult subject, this picture book’s no-nonsense factual approach is helpful and enlightening.

When Someone in the Family Drinks Too Much

books for kids coping with alcoholic parent

More Picture Books about Living in an Alcoholic Home

My Dad by Niki Daly

Gracie and her older brother are coping as best they can with their family situation. Their father is a happy drunk most Friday nights when his buddies come over but he doesn’t think he has a problem. He argues a lot with their mom but things come to a head when he and Gracie perform for a Friday night school concert. They deliberately neglect to tell their father because they are anxious about what state he might be in, but he shows up anyway and embarrasses them with his loud and inappropriate behavior. This is the turning point for their father and he joins AA (Alcoholics Anonymous), finally realizing that he’s sick and can get better.

This picture book is in loving memory of Niki Daly’s father and a testimony of the unconditional love a child has for a parent.

Wishes and Worries: Coping with a Parent Who Drinks Too Much Alcohol by Centre For Addiction And Mental Health and Lars Rudebjer

Wishes and Worries is a realistic portrayal of what it’s like for a child to live in an alcoholic home. For Maggie, she acts out because she’s angry and has trouble focusing at school. Her parents fight a lot which makes her want to cry but her siblings cope by either withdrawing or storming out.

Things get better when Maggie finds she can talk to her teacher at school. He directs her to the school counselor, Miss Yee, who lets her know that this is not her fault but also helps her come up with coping strategies including making a list of adults she can turn to.

Maggie learns that some people can drink without issue while others can not. Her father finds someone to talk to also and his new doctor is going to help him with his drinking problem. Her father has a few setbacks but now Maggie has tools to help her cope with her fear and anger.

Bottles Break by Nancy Maria Grande Tabor

“Sometimes I think my mom would rather have a bottle than me.”

With very simple illustrations, this picture book conveys the difficult feelings children living in an alcoholic home experience: anger, guilt, nervousness, depression, sadness and embarrassment. Tabor uses a bottle as an analogy for adults with an alcohol problem: when they are full, they are people but after they drink they are empty. They both break too. Tabor also  includes writing for kids as one coping strategy.

 

Our Gracie Aunt by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by Jon J Muth

This story is more about addiction than alcoholism though it’s not outright stated. I have included this picture book because it might be comforting to know that other children are in similar circumstances where a social worker has to intervene and take them to live somewhere else. In the case of Johnson and his older sister Beebee, they are placed with their estranged Aunt Gracie who creates a wonderful place for them to live and waits patiently until they are ready to love her back. [picture book, ages 4 and up]

Workbook Helping Books for Children Working with an Adult

These workbooks guide kids living in an alcoholic home to educate them that This Is Not Their Fault, help them analyze their feelings and teach them coping strategies in a step-by-step format allowing them to write and draw in the books. These books work equally well with a therapist or an adult relative who can systematically meet on a schedule to through a chapter per meeting. It offers support to kids by helping them express about their feelings and gives them the education to move forward.

My Dad Loves Me, My Dad has a Disease ( A Child’s View Living with Addiction) by Claudia Black

This workbook would work especially well with very young children and it’s filled with drawings by other kids coping with the same issues. For those kids who might need encouragement to express how they are feeling, this book supplies illustrations to make them feel less alone.

An Elephant In the Living Room The Children’s Book by Jill M. Hastings and Marion H. Typpo

Jill Hastings wrote this workbook because: “I still remember the confusion and loneliness I felt while growing up in a family where drinking was a problem. That’s why I wrote this book.” Her intension is that it will help kids understand that alcoholism is a disease, learn new ways to handle their feelings, and learn to like themselves better.

I Can Be Me: A Helping Book for Children From Troubled Families by Dianne S. O’Connor, Ed.D.

This is a workbook that educates and supports young children growing up with addicted family members including drug and alcohol addiction. This step-by-step helpful program centers around teaching kids to cope with problems they understand so that their coping patterns are healthy. “Untreated, children of the chemically dependent often adopt behaviors which predispose them to addiction, abusive/or addicted marriage partners and various other mental health problems. They experience difficulty developing healthy close relationships, have trouble expressing feelings and often suffer from low self-esteem.”

p.s. More book lists on difficult topics:

Keeping Kids Safe from Inappropriate Touch

Teaching Kids About Inappropriate Touch

To examine any book more closely at Amazon, please click on image of book.

Picture Book of the Day for Kids Living in Alcoholic Home

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By Mia Wenjen, PragmaticMom

14 Comments

  1. Thanks for sharing these titles, Mia! I am unfamiliar with all of them, but you are so right. Kids need to know that they are not alone in situations like these! I know that the American Psychological Association’s Magination Press is a publisher with many books on an assortment of issues related to mental health, and other health related issues

  2. It is heartbreaking that this percentage is so high. Thank you for raising awareness and sharing these resources.
    maryanne recently posted…Activities to Help Kids Calm Down and Stay CalmMy Profile

  3. Great round-up and one that hits home. Thanks for addressing a difficult topic.

  4. This is a serious topic. There aren’t many books about this, but the ones you showed seem to handle it well.
    Erik – TKRB recently posted…Perfect Picture Book Friday! Goodnight Already! by Jory JohnMy Profile

  5. Liz

    Had no idea children’s books like these existed. Thanks for posting about them.
    Liz recently posted…Zoe vs. the Eighties: “Livin’ on a Prayer”My Profile

  6. I hope never to have to recur to these books, but it’s a great thing to know they exist. If I ever know of anyone needing help with this matter, I’ll always remember your list. Visiting from the #KidLitBlogHop
    Erika recently posted…Victorian Tea Time and TalesMy Profile

  7. Next year check out Plastic Ahoy! by Patricia Newman. Geared for teens, is all about plastic in the ocean. It won the Earth Day Book Award this year.

    Thanks for getting the word out about books on the environment!

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