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Diversity Picture Books for Children GIVEAWAY

The lack of diversity in children’s literature is a problem that affects all children, especially children from low-income families, who rarely see themselves, their families or their communities in the stories they read. First Book

diversity in children's books

The lack of diversity in children’s books is alarming and I am pledging to promote more multicultural books for kids. So today for Picture Book of the Day, I am giving away three diversity picture books for children to three winners!

diversity in kidlit, diversity in children's books

How Far Do You Love Me? by Lulu Delacre

Travel around the world to special places with families of all races and ethnicities in this charming book that speaks of boundless love between a parent and a child.

Locations include The Grand Canyon (Arizona, USA), Cenote Dzitnup (Yucatan, Mexico), Machu Pichu (Andes Mountain Range, Peru), glacier (Antartic Penisula, Antarctica), Serengeti Plain (Tanzania), Sinai Peninsula (Egypt), Provence (France), Alps Mountain Range (Switzerland), and more.

Think of this as an international armchair travel Guess How Much I Love You?

I wanted to add a few more multicultural picture books for kids with an African theme. They would pair up nicely with How Far Do You Love Me?

 

Hugo Hippo’s ABC Fun Book in Africa by Gail A. Porter, illustrated by James Okello

Hugo the Hippo traverses the continent of Africa in a fun, alliterative way.

D d

Here’s Hugo …

driving a dik-dik

to a dance

in Dar-es-Sallam

 

Beneath the Rainbow: A Collection of Children’s Stories and Poems from Kenya Volume 1

A collection of poems and stories from Kenya preserve an oral tradition of  folk tales spun in a modern way.

 

Thank you to my Twitter friend @laurentobia for this suggestion!

Anna’s Hibiscus by Atinuke

Early chapter books set in modern Africa about a middle-class family are hard to find in this country. Early chapter books that deftly handle the difficult issues of poverty, class, and economics are even rarer. Nigerian-born Atinuke’s series about young Anna Hibiscus and her large extended family do these things with grace and humor. Originally published in England, the first two are now available here. Anna Hibiscus lives in “Africa—amazing Africa,” in a city of “lagoons and bridges . . . skyscrapers and shanty towns.” Her mother is from Canada, her father from Africa, and she has twin baby brothers, Double and Trouble. Each of the four chapters tells a complete story and, while presenting clear cultural differences, explores themes that are universal and child-centered. A story about selling oranges from a family tree is of special interest as a resource for primary classrooms with economics benchmarks. Never didactic, the fluid storytelling is enhanced by Tobia’s charming illustrations. While it is disappointing that a specific country is never identified, the book’s strong features make it noteworthy. Grades 1-3. –Lynn Rutan –This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

 

Thank you to Erin for leaving these great suggestions in the comments below:

Tikki Tikki Tembo retold by Arlene Mosel

We love this book too and my kids love rattling off his very long name which they have memorized with great delight!

The Moccasin Goalie by William Roy Brownridge

Where Is Gah-Ning? by Robert Munsch

Whoever You Are by Mem Fox

If the World Were a Village: A Book About the World’s People by David J. Smith

 

 

Author Barbara Mojica had this great suggestion:

Four Feet Two Sandals by Karen Lynn Williams and Khadra Mohammed

When relief workers bring used clothing to a refugee camp in Pakistan, ten-year-old Lina is thrilled when she finds a sandal that fits her foot perfectly – until she sees that another girl has the matching shoe. But soon Lina and Feroza meet and decide that it is better to share the sandals than for each to wear only one. The girls discover the true meaning of friendship and sacrifice. “Four Feet, Two Sandals” honors the experiences of refugee children around the world, whose daily existence is marked by uncertainty and fear. Warm colors and bold brush strokes are the perfect complement to this story of courage and hope.

 

Debbie R has these great suggestions!

1. Tales of Wisdom and Wonder is nice and contains folk tales from around the world.

2. We’re Sailing Down the Nile

3. Barefoot Book of Buddhist Tales

4. The Wise Fool Fables from the Islamic World

5. Fireside Stories 

6. One City, Two Brothers

7. A Calendar of Festivals Celebrations From Around the World

8. The Girl With A Brave Heart

 

Diversity Picture Book Giveaway

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The three books for the giveaway are:

How Far Do You Love Me? by Lulu Delacre

Hugo Hippo’s ABC Fun Book in Africa by Gail A. Porter, illustrated by James Okello

Beneath the Rainbow: A Collection of Children’s Stories and Poems from Kenya Volume 1

Please pick one and leave the name in the comments. Additionally, I’d love to hear what your favorite multicultural book? Please share!

 

To examine any book more closely at Amazon, please click on image of book.

diversity picture books for children, picture books with diversity, diversity and picture books,

I am an Amazon affiliate which means if you buy anything through my blog, I get a very small kickback at no cost to you. I use this money to pay for postage and handling for my giveaways.

Follow PragmaticMom’s board Multicultural Books for Kids on Pinterest.

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By Mia Wenjen, PragmaticMom

34 Comments

  1. Valerie

    Beneath the Rainbow: A Collection of Children’s Stories and Poems from Kenya Volume 1

  2. How far do you love me?
    Asianmommy recently posted…Great Spots for kids at Niagara FallsMy Profile

  3. Cool, Mia. I like that you’re focusing on this- I’m surprised at the low percentages. I think about when we were kids and there was virtually no diversity in picture books.
    Artchoo recently posted…Playdough Fun: Adventures With DIY PlaydoughMy Profile

    • Hi Artchoo!,
      I remember those days. It was impossible when I was a kid to find an Asian American on TV or in a children’s book. When Joy Luck Club came out, I was trembling, I was so excited. I bought the hard copy even though I didn’t much $ at the time because it was a first for me to see books about my family story. I still have it. My mom says it’s collectible as a first edition LOL!
      Pragmatic Mom recently posted…Diversity Picture Books for Children GIVEAWAYMy Profile

  4. Erin

    I think the greatest need is for books that include native Americans and Canadians. As a teacher when I read picture books to my students, I see some diversity but definitely not enough and definitely a rarity to see a First Nations person in a child’s picture book or in an older student’s novel.

    Some of my favourite books are:

    Tikki Tikki Tembo retold by Arlene Mosel
    The Moccasin Goalie by William Roy Brownridge
    Where Is Gah-Ning? by Robert Munsch
    Whoever You Are by Mem Fox
    If the World Were a Village: A Book About the World’s People by David J. Smith.

    The last book is one of my and my students’ favourites because you learn so much about our world community.

  5. Kim

    Anna’s Hibiscus sounds interesting to me.
    I wish there were more picture/chapter books about the Latino culture.
    I see a great need at my children’s school district for that. It may help
    in a common understanding of each other’s lives.
    Kim recently posted…Diversity Picture Books for Children GIVEAWAYMy Profile

  6. There are so many books listed here that I’m not sure which three are being given away but the one I am most interested in is How Far Do You Love Me?
    Mama (Karen) Carmody recently posted…July Family Friendly Events 2013My Profile

    • Hi Mama Karen,
      Sorry, I got so excited and started adding all the great books. I can see how it is confusing.

      The givewaway books are:

      How Far Do You Love Me? by Lulu Delacre

      Hugo Hippo’s ABC Fun Book in Africa by Gail A. Porter, illustrated by James Okello

      Beneath the Rainbow: A Collection of Children’s Stories and Poems from Kenya Volume 1
      Pragmatic Mom recently posted…Diversity Picture Books for Children GIVEAWAYMy Profile

  7. Recently read Four Feet Two Sandals by Karen Lynn Williams and Khadra Mohammed about refugee children.
    Barbara Mojica recently posted…WAR AND PEACEMy Profile

    • Thanks Barbara!
      I’m adding it to the list! I’ve been meaning to email you … would you like to guest post for me? You can talk about your new book and if you want, I can do a Q and A with you. I tried to find your book at home but I’m not sure why it’s not on my pile. Did you give me a PDF? I really want to read it.
      Pragmatic Mom recently posted…Diversity Picture Books for Children GIVEAWAYMy Profile

  8. Whoever You Are is one of my favorites – I wrote about it way back when I was a new blogger.I think that How Far Do You Love Me sounds fantastic!
    maryanne recently posted…Amigurumi and Waldorf Inspired Baby Doll Crochet PatternMy Profile

  9. Debbie R.

    You should ( if you haven’t already) check out books put out by Barefoot Books their titles are very culturally diverse!

  10. Debbie R.

    I have several of their titles( Barefoot Books) full disclosure…I have considered selling their products but haven’t taken the leap yet. With that being said, we own several titles…1. Tales of Wisdom and Wonder is nice and contains folk tales from around the world. 2. We’re Sailing Down the Nile. 3.The Barefoot Book of Buddhist Tales. 4. The Wise Fool Fables from the Islamic World. 5.Fireside Stories. 6. One City, Two Brothers. 7. A Calendar of Festivals Celebrations From Around the World. 8. The Girl With A Brave Heart.

    These are just a few of my favorites. but there are so many wonderful titles. We are a blended family and these titles help me to teach my child that everyone is different and yet we are all still the same at heart( inherently good), these are important lessons for my child. I am a Christian white American with a German heritage, my husband is fromJordan and is Muslim and we want tolerance to be key in our child’s upbringing. thanks for asking which titles wer good for us.

    • Hi Debbie,
      Thank you for your wonderful book list. I’m adding it to the post! We are a blended family of sorts too. My kids are Chinese, Japanese and Korean. I love multicultural books for learning about other cultures as well as doing this through food and travel! I do think it works to teach kids tolerance as well!
      Pragmatic Mom recently posted…Rising Kindergarten Summer Reading ListMy Profile

  11. Ann

    Strange because I think it is so much more interesting to read about different cultures!
    Publishing companies should recruit maybe.
    I think we would pick the Hippo ABC, we love alphabet books!
    Ann recently posted…Make a SplashMy Profile

  12. I’d love How Far Do You Love Me?

    My favorite multicultural children’s book is Cora Cooks Pancit by Dorina K. Lazo Gilmore and Kristi Valiant. A sweet book that reminds me of my childhood!

  13. Stephanie G

    The Girl With the Brave Heart, How Far Do You Love Me. I’d love to add any of the books you mentioned to my daughter’s book collection they all sound great!

  14. You come up with the best book lists! Will be passing this list on to my daughter for her school library. Thanks for sharing on the Kid Lit Blog Hop! Cheryl, Hop Hostess
    Cheryl Carpinello recently posted…Kid Lit Blog Hop #20My Profile

  15. Wow, the statistics you have there about the lack of diversity in children’s books is shocking. I wonder of the books that do include people of color, how many of them are focused on culture or country of origins, and how many are stories where the characters just happen to be of color. I hope there’s a balance of both.

    I’m in Canada, so some of my favorite multicultural books are about native Canadians. One is called When I Was Eight, and it tells about an inuit girl going to a residential school.

    Of the three you list in the giveaway, the one about stories from Kenya sounds most interesting to me.
    Christy recently posted…Picture books about hobbies and collectionsMy Profile

    • Hi Christy,
      I know! Shocking! Especially with the demographics of the United States that show a growing middle class of Latino Americans and Asian Americans! I am going to try to promote more diversity books for kids henceforth!!

      Thanks for your great book recommendation. I’ll add it to my post of diversity books recommended by readers!
      Pragmatic Mom recently posted…Healthy Milk Alternatives for KidsMy Profile

  16. All great suggestions Mia! I’m a little slow hopping around on the Kid Lit Blog Hop – sorry I missed your giveaway. My sis was visiting! :-)
    Renee recently posted…Book Spotlight and Giveaway: Charis – Journey to Pandora’s JarMy Profile

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