Thankful turkey pinecone craft for kids

Happy Thanksgiving with Recipes and Crafts for Kids

Thanksgiving Marinated Prime Rib Recipe

Is this blasphemy? We are not roasting a turkey this year. I am the only one who likes it so we are doing a marinated rib roast from an old Gourmet LA cook book instead. Alas, the cookbook is out of print and no where to be found. You’ll need to marinade the roast and let the Yorkshire pudding batter chill overnight, so please plan accordingly.

p.s. I’ll post photos of these recipes on Thanksgiving once I make it.

Marinated Prime Rib Recipe from Gourmet LA

1 5-pound boneless rib eye roast (or larger depending on number of guests)

1/2 cup coarsely cracked black pepper corns (you MUST use a mortle and pestle. I’ve tried a spice grinder, a mill, and pre-ground and it’s not the same.)

1/2 teaspooon ground cardamon

1 cup soy sauce (we use Kikkoman brand)

1/4 cup red wine vinegar (any brand will do)

1 tablespoon tomato paste (do you have the tube kind? Very handy for just 1 tablespoon!)

1 teaspoon paprika (sweet not smoked)

4 cloves garlic, minced

1) Place roast in a pan or huge zip lock bag. Combine cracked black pepper with cardamon and pat firmly on meat all over.

2) Combine rest of ingredients and pour over.

3) Marinade overnight in refrigerator, turning occasionally.

4) Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Remove roast from marinade. Insert meat thermometer (do not let it touch foil). Roast 45 minutes to 1 hour or until thermometer reaches 140 degrees F.

5) Let meat rest for 10 minutes before carving.

 

We serve with these parboiled yet crunchy roasted parsnips, carrots and potatoes from Saveur magazine and individual Yorkshire Puddings using a cupcake pan.

 

Roasted Vegetables from Saveur Magazine

4 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and quartered

1.5 pounds small carrots, peeled and trimmed

1.5 pounds parsnips, peeled, trimmed and quartered lengthwise

salt

1 cup flour

freshly ground black pepper

1) Put the potatoes, carrots, and parsnips into a large pot of cold salted water and bring to boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium and parboil vegetables for about 10 minutes. Drain, reserve 1.5 cups of cooking water and set aside. (Vegetables can be cooked up to one hour ahead).

2) Pour 1/2 cup of the reserved drippings (or a combo of drippings and olive oil) into a large roasting pan and put into the 450 degree oven until the fat is hot.

3) Combine flour, salt and pepper in plastic bag or large bowl. Dredge veggies in flour, shaking off excess.

4) Remove pan from oven. Add flour coated vegetables and roll in oil.

5) Roast until golden, about 30 to 45 minutes, turning several times. Serve hot.

 

Yorkshire Pudding from Saveur Magazine

1 cup flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 eggs lightly beaten

1 cup milk

1) Sift flour and salt. Add eggs and milk, whisking until smooth. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

2) Put 1 teaspoon of drippings or drippings and olive oil into each cupcake cup, then put pan into 450 degree oven until hot.

3) Stir batter and put about 1/4 cup into each pan. Be careful, pan is hot!

4) Bake until puffed and golden, about 30 minutes.

 

Horseradish Cream from Saveur Magazine

I usually just by this in a jar but I can’t find it so I am going to make my own this year.

1 cup heavy cream

1/4 cup prepared horseradish

1 teaspoon white wine vinegar

salt and freshly ground pepper

1) Whisk cream in medium bowl until soft peaks form.

2) Fold in horseradish and vinegar.

3) Season to taste with salt and pepper.

4) Transfer to serving bowl and refrigerate until ready to use. Can be made up to one hour ahead.

Easy Green Beans My Kids Eat

1 pound green beans or Haricot Verts

Salt (Maldon Salt preferred)

Olive oil

Lemon

1) Snap ends of beans. Rinse and place in glass or ceramic bowl.

2) Microwave for 1 minute on high.

3) Season with salt, pepper, olive oil and lemon. We use an olive oil crushed with lemons.

Thanksgiving Crafts for Kids

Admittedly, I am the worst at doing arts and crafts with my kids. Watercolor painting I can do. Crafts, not so much! I just don’t have any good ideas for crafts which is why I love Pinterest. There are so many great ones and these are my favorites. I might even try to pull one of these off!

Nichole Heady has a wonderful Gratitude Turkey project that would also double as a lovely centerpiece! Perhaps you can read some of the feathers out loud during dinner as well!

Nichole Heady, gratitude turkey project for kids

If you need to keep little people busy while you cook, here’s a printable of free coloring pages from Celebrations at Home.

Thanksgiving coloring sheets

Mama Smiles has an adorable handprint turkey craft that would double as a nice place card!

thanksgiving craft, handprint turkey craft

Kiwi Crate has a great idea for a doily turkey craft. You could set up a table with this and put a few adults on kid craft duty.

Turkey doily craft for kids, Kiwi Crate

Give Thanks Turkey place cards are fun to make. You can also use to them to play a game and guess who is thankful for what! From Creating Couture Parties.

Thankful turkey pinecone craft for kids

Chiquita Moms has 11 great turkey handprint ideas for crafts.

chiquita moms, turkey handprint crafts,

 

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving Mad Lips Printable from Are We There Yet?

I adore this pinecone turkey from Iowa Farm Wife! There is something very reassuring about it’s uniqueness.
pinecone turkey, iowa farm wife
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By Mia Wenjen, PragmaticMom

16 Comments

  1. Your menu sounds delicious!

    Thanks for including our handprint turkey in your activities round-up :)
    maryanne recently posted…Tomie dePaola’s Popcorn BookMy Profile

  2. Dee

    No worries, Mia! You are not strange for not cooking a turkey. Growing up, we often didn’t cook a turkey. Instead, we cooked a French Canadian dish called Roppe’ Pie (my spelling on that may be off). It’s a lot of work to make, so Thanksgiving was an ideal time to make it; Christmas was just too busy. SOMEday, I will get brave enough to try it, although my family loves turkey so I don’t think they’ll let me do it on Thanksgiving! Hope it’s a wonderful day for all of you! I’m sharing some of these great craft ideas.
    Dee recently posted…You are not alone!My Profile

    • Hi Dee,
      It turns out that your Roppe Pie has a Boston connection! I looked it up and it sounds delicious! I’m glad you liked the craft ideas. I love Pinterest for crafts since I am not good at that.

      Rappie pie is a traditional Acadian meal, sometimes referred to as “rapure pie” or “râpure”.[1][2] Its name is derived from the French “patates râpées” meaning “grated potatoes.” It is a casserole-like dish traditionally formed by grating potatoes, then squeezing them through cheesecloth. The liquid removed was replaced by adding hot broth made from chicken, pork or seafood along with meat and onions, and layering additional grated potatoes over the top .[3] Presently most people will put the potatoes in a juicer to remove the liquid. The rest of the process remains the same.
      [edit]History

      It is thought that rappie pie has its origins in the Acadian Expulsion, among Acadians who chose to live out their exile in Boston. This opportunity to meet and interact with other immigrant groups would naturally encourage a sharing of cultural recipes. It may have been German or Swiss immigrants who taught the Acadians their technique for using grated potatoes in their recipes, but whoever it was, this proved to be an important tip for those that returned to Nova Scotia when the expulsion was lifted. When they returned, they found that their fertile land had been given to New Englanders lured north by the promise of farmland. The harsh, rocky land that remained was excellent for growing potatoes, if little else, so the Acadians used them to fill out dishes made with what game was available.[4]

      • Dee

        Thanks for the info! I grew up in the Boston area, in fact, that’s where my grandmother immigrated to from Nova Scotia in the 1920s. The description is dead on! I hear that you can actually order it in Nova Scotia restaurants, which is a bizarre concept to me!
        Dee recently posted…You are not alone!My Profile

  3. What a lovely & healthy platter!
    Asianmommy recently posted…LEGO TurkeyMy Profile

    • Hi Asian Mommy,
      I can’t take credit for that turkey crudite platter but yes, it’s so awesome!!! I saw several versions of it on Pinterest but that particular one by LivingLocurto.com really caught my eye!

  4. Chris

    I’m hosting Thanksgiving this year for only the 2nd time in my life. I was wondering what I’d do for an appetizer, or even if I’d do one at all.

    Seeing the adorable turkey crudites platter has helped me decide. And my kids (17 and 10 years old) will be responsible for putting it together. That ought to keep them busy for awhile. :-)

  5. Ann

    Mmm, that sounds really good. Might try the rib eye roast recipe for xmas!

    Also might try some doily turkeys too!

    Happy turkey, I mean rib eye roast day!
    Ann recently posted…CowabungaMy Profile

  6. I suggest you check out the Tree of Thanks. While you’re waiting for the turkey to cook, a Tree of Thanks is a wonderful activity to break the ice between generations, keep guests entertained, encourage a sense of gratitude and create a heart-felt decoration to celebrate the season. From the kid-friendly thankful turkey to a more contemporary centerpiece, Trees of Thanks will remind guests young and old what they are grateful for.

    • Hi PeppyParents,
      Thanks so much for the Tree of Thanks idea! What a great activity! I love it! I was talking to some parents yesterday and we all were thinking that the nicest thing about Thanksgiving is the chance to take a break from life and be thankful for what we have. It’s really the only holiday that we have for that.

  7. I LOVE the veggie turkey above. Cook whatever you want for Thanksgiving and Christmas. I’m just thankful my daughter cooked Thanksgiving dinner and we only have to cook Christmas this year. My husband totally wrecks the kitchen – but it is delicious. Probably having ham and turkey and will freeze leftovers. Love your blog.
    Susan Case recently posted…Stocking Stuffers for Kids: A Teacher’s Top 10My Profile

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