chapter books, chapter books for 3rd grade, chapter books for 2nd grade, chapter books for 6th grade, chapter books for boys,

New Chapter Books for 2nd Grade through 7th Grade

Chapter Books Hot off the Presses for Ages 7 and Up

My seven-year-old (nearly 8!) and I have been enjoying the Tales of a 6th Grade Muppet series by Kirk Scroggs.  It’s a series that is similar to the wildly popular Diary of a Wimpy Kid but with less bullying. What’s strange is that he has never seen the Muppets but he still likes the books.

I have another y0ung friend in 7th grade who loves the Muppets and reads reluctantly so this series was a natural fit. Kudos to this series for captivating boys with such a wide age range!

I wouldn’t have thought my son was ready for chapter books but these hybrids of semi-graphic novels chapter books make for an easy transition from easy chapter book series like Magic Tree House.

Grace Lin came out with a companion book to her Newbery Honor book Where the Mountain Meets the Moon. While this book has been wildly popular at my school with girls from ages 8 and up, it didn’t seem to get the same attention from boys. I’m hoping Starry River of the Sky with a strong boy character will get boys to pick up her two really excellent chapter books that weave Chinese mythology into an adventure story.

Do your kids clamor for newly published chapter books or only if it’s the next in a series they love?

 

ParaNorman by Elizabeth Cody Kimmel

11-year old Norman Babcock has an usual gift; he can see and talk to ghosts. It’s not a talent that makes him a popular kid. But when his home town of Salem in Massachusetts is attacked by zombie Pilgrims, Norman’s talents are called upon to save the town. He must first solve the mystery of a witch killed long ago during the Salem witch trials which brings personal revelations as well. Now a 3-D animated movie, I’d try this chapter book with boys who like action adventure, grades 2 and up.

Riley Mack and the Other Known Troublemakers by Chris Grabenstein

If your child liked the movie Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, then Riley Mack has the same premise of kids running circles around bumbling adults. In this case, seventh grader Riley Mack and five of his closest friends must foil 2 bank robbers, solve the mystery of $4000 missing dollars, save 57 dogs, and stop a middle school bully. It’s an action-packed caper for kids ages 9 and up.

Middle School: Get Me out of Here! by James Patterson

Rafe’s story continues as a 7th grader in this sequel to Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life. When Rafe’s mother loses her job, they are forced to move to the city to live with his grandmother. The new art school brings challenges including bullying and a new friend who turns out to be more of a “frenemy.” Rafe is clearly searching — to get a life, understand why his father left, and, subconsciously perhaps, find his self-identity. Diary of a Wimpy Kid fans, particularly reluctant boy readers in middle school, are a natural fit for this cartoon graphics rich chapter book.

Starry River of the Sky by Grace Lin

I’m a huge fan of Grace Lin’s work her latest companion book to Newbery Honor winning Where the Mountain Meets the Moon did not disappoint. In fact, I think it’s her best work to date. She masterfully weaves Chinese mythology into an adventure story of a young boy’s rebellion against his greedy and self-absorbed father, Magistrate Tiger. Rendi is a more complex and realistic character than Minli’s beatific can do optimism. But it’s probably more correct to think of this pair of books as yin and yang counterparts with each resolving the issue of how the moon meets the mountain. I’d recommend this book to kids ages 8 and up.

Tales of a Sixth-Grade Muppet Book 3: The Good, the Bad, and the Fuzzy by Kirk Scroggs

The premise for this series is intrinsically comical. 6th grader Danvers Blickensderfer wakes up one morning to find that he’s been transformed into a muppet. Each book in the series has Danvers searching for a reverse Muppetophosis while he grapples with the reality of middle school life from bullies to boy band battles, all the while assisted by his pals in the Muppet theatre. We find the muppet characters to be an integral part of the fun. This series is particularly suited for reluctant boy readers but boys 7 and up will enjoy it.

To view any book at Amazon, click on image next to book review.

To purchase at Barnes and Noble, click on image below.

I receive review copies of many of the book I cover though I also purchase and borrow books as well. These books were all review copies. My opinions are my own.

Follow PragmaticMom’s board Best Graphic Novels on Pinterest.


If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.

By Mia Wenjen, PragmaticMom

6 Comments

  1. Love the new look!!!! Also, I like the covers of the ParaNorman and Riley Mack books. Will look for them!
    The Brain Lair recently posted…It’s Monday – What Are You Reading 10/15/12My Profile

    • Hi Brain Lair,
      Thanks so much! I’d love to know what you think of ParaNorman (now a movie) and Riley Mack. I had a 10-year-old boy review Riley Mack for me and he liked it even though he didn’t think it was very realistic.

  2. Here’s another funny book for reluctant boy readers (girls like it, too!):
    The Annoying Ghost Kid: “The Annoying Ghost Kid is a funny story about Corky, a ten year old boy, who is tormented by Duke, a younger boy who happens to be a ghost. Duke loves to play practical jokes on Corky. It’s like having a pesky little brother with special powers. The fun begins when Corky, and his friend Jill, are challenged to find imaginative ways to stop the ghost kid’s tricks! In the beginning, the ghost kid clearly has the advantage, but eventually, Corky and Jill finally figure out how to turn things around on their transparent tormenter. Then, it’s back and forth, and the pranks get funnier and funnier as the supernatural nuisance goes head to head with two increasingly clever kids.”
    http://www.amazon.com/Annoying-Ghost-Kid-1/dp/0615576877

    From Robert in my LinkedIn Group Elementary School Teachers of America
    Pragmatic Mom recently posted…Catching Up: Bloggy Business and New GigsMy Profile

    • Here’s another funny book for reluctant boy readers (girls like it, too!):
      The Annoying Ghost Kid: “The Annoying Ghost Kid is a funny story about Corky, a ten year old boy, who is tormented by Duke, a younger boy who happens to be a ghost. Duke loves to play practical jokes on Corky. It’s like having a pesky little brother with special powers. The fun begins when Corky, and his friend Jill, are challenged to find imaginative ways to stop the ghost kid’s tricks! In the beginning, the ghost kid clearly has the advantage, but eventually, Corky and Jill finally figure out how to turn things around on their transparent tormenter. Then, it’s back and forth, and the pranks get funnier and funnier as the supernatural nuisance goes head to head with two increasingly clever kids.”
      http://www.amazon.com/Annoying-Ghost-Kid-1/dp/0615576877

      From Robert in my LinkedIn Group Elementary School Teachers of America

    • A book geared toward older (grade 5 and up) readers is Visions (The Secret Watchers, book1) Fourteen year old Owen only wants to ride his skateboard and be left alone until he discovers a special ability. Now he can see evil and darkness and feels compelled to fix the broken world around him. Owen is an average guy and a humble hero who finds his life will never be the same. He is thrown into a race against time… will he master his special ability or be struck down by the dark watchers? http://thesecretwatchers.com/?page_id=563

      From Lauren in my LinkedIn Group Elementary School Teachers of America

    • Thanks for the great recommendations! I’ll add to my post comment section so my readers will know!

Leave a Comment

CommentLuv badge